Can you bitcoin mine behind a firewall where ports are ...

Can you bitcoin mine behind a firewall where ports are blocked? or maybe download to mine offline?

Can you bitcoin mine behind a firewall where ports are blocked? or maybe download to mine offline?
submitted by flybythesun to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Can you bitcoin mine behind a firewall where ports are blocked? or maybe download to mine offline? /r/Bitcoin

Can you bitcoin mine behind a firewall where ports are blocked? or maybe download to mine offline? /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Nice hash actually carries Trojan virus

I don’t know if it’s just me but I decided I wanted to mine some bitcoin using my gpu at first I kept getting virus alert messages that I gave access btw I downloaded nice hash directly from the GitHub page they redirected me to . So then later I noticed the symptoms of the virus begin to show up. The computer started running very slowly also all my norton firewalls were off somehow I did not switch them off every time I went to switch it back on norton crashed. Then comping to the internet I don’t know if it’s Cisco Webex but it never did this before I was using my phone and it kept loading and never joined . At this point I decided to disconnect my internet from my pc. It then connected . I think bandwidth was reduced but can’t be sure it could be webex’s fault .anyone confirm if this.I booted into safe mode after and after that I could not login using my password I don’t think that is a symptom of the virus but can someone confirm this.
Update :- my pc now wasn’t booting up non of the ports were working my keyboard or mouse were not working ik cause they didn’t light up meaning no power . So I did a cmos reset didn’t work so my motherboard has the option to Re flash the bios it’s the x570 meg motherboard so I reflagged my bios and it booted up . Btw this never happened I build my pc myself tested each and every part only after I downloaded this garbage miner I started facing problems.
When u think antivirus are lying I don’t think so y other miners work perfectly fine with the antivirus only this piece of shit software doesn’t . It somehow managed to go to my bios how the f did they do that idk but I swear u literally want trouble if u download this
Edit 3:- ended up deleting windows and downloading it back from a usb stick
submitted by brendantoscano to NiceHash [link] [comments]

Running a Bitcoin node on a $11.99 SBC

Running a Bitcoin node on a $11.99 SBC
Just wanted to let you guys know that I'm successfully running a (pruned) Bitcoin node + TOR on a $11.99 single board computer (Rock Pi S).
The SBC contains a Rockchip RK3308 Quad A35 64bit processor, 512MB RAM, RJ45 Ethernet and USB2 port and I'm using a 64GB SDCard. It runs a version of Armbian (410MB free). There's a new version available that even gives you 480MB RAM, but I'm waiting for Bitcoin Core 0.19 before upgrading.
To speed things up I decided to run Bitcoin Core on a more powerful device to sync the whole blockchain to an external HDD. After that I made a copy and ran it in pruned mode to end up with the last 5GB of the blockchain. I copied the data to the SD card and ran it on the Rock Pi S. After verifying all blocks it runs very smoothly. Uptime at the moment is 15 days.
I guess you could run a full node as well if you put in a 512GB SDcard.
The Rock Pi S was sold out, but if anybody is interested, they started selling a new batch of Rock Pi S v1.2 from today.
Screenshot of resources being used
Bitcoin Core info
Around 1.5 GB is being transferred every day
---
Some links and a short How to for people that want to give it a try:
  1. This is the place where I bought the Rock Pi S.
  2. Here you find more information about Armbian on the Rock Pi S. Flash it to your SDCard. Follow these instructions.
  3. Disable ZRAM swap on Armbian. If you don't do this eventually Bitcoin Core will crash. nano /etc/default/armbian-zram-config ENABLED=false
  4. Enable SWAP on Armbian sudo fallocate -l 1G /swapfile sudo chmod 600 /swapfile sudo mkswap /swapfile sudo swapon /swapfile sudo swapon --show sudo cp /etc/fstab /etc/fstab.bak echo '/swapfile none swap sw 0 0' | sudo tee -a /etc/fstab
  5. Set up UFW Firewall sudo ufw default deny incoming sudo ufw default allow outgoing sudo ufw allow ssh # we want to allow ssh connections or else we won’t be able to login. sudo ufw allow 8333 # port 8333 is used for bitcoin nodes sudo ufw allow 9051 # port 9051 is used for tor sudo ufw logging on sudo ufw enable sudo ufw status
  6. Add user Satoshi so you don't run the Bitcoin Core as root sudo adduser satoshi --home /home/satoshi --disabled-login sudo passwd satoshi # change passwd sudo usermod -aG sudo satoshi # add user to sudo group
  7. Download (ARM64 version) and install Bitcoin Core Daemon
  8. Download and install TOR (optional). I followed two guides. This one and this one.
  9. Create a bitcoin.conf config file in the .bitcoin directory. Mine looks like this: daemon=1 prune=5000 dbcache=300 maxmempool=250 onlynet=onion proxy=127.0.0.1:9050 bind=127.0.0.1 #Add seed nodes seednode=wxvp2d4rspn7tqyu.onion seednode=bk5ejfe56xakvtkk.onion seednode=bpdlwholl7rnkrkw.onion seednode=hhiv5pnxenvbf4am.onion seednode=4iuf2zac6aq3ndrb.onion seednode=nkf5e6b7pl4jfd4a.onion seednode=xqzfakpeuvrobvpj.onion seednode=tsyvzsqwa2kkf6b2.onion #And/or add some nodes addnode=gyn2vguc35viks2b.onion addnode=kvd44sw7skb5folw.onion addnode=nkf5e6b7pl4jfd4a.onion addnode=yu7sezmixhmyljn4.onion addnode=3ffk7iumtx3cegbi.onion addnode=3nmbbakinewlgdln.onion addnode=4j77gihpokxu2kj4.onion addnode=5at7sq5nm76xijkd.onion addnode=77mx2jsxaoyesz2p.onion addnode=7g7j54btiaxhtsiy.onion ddnode=a6obdgzn67l7exu3.onion
  10. Start Bitcoin Daemon with the command bitcoind -listenonion
Please note that I'm not a professional. So if anything above is not 100% correct, let me know and I will change it, but this is my setup at the moment.
submitted by haste18 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Scared to use my computer. Feeling crazy. Please help.

Is it possible for someone to use your computer to mine bitcoins without your knowledge? Or allocate your resources elsewhere remotely for profit? Also, is it possible for someone to disguise a virtual environment?
Some context, my husband is going nuts because after a year of uninstalling/reinstalling, flashing BIOS and disabling services he still can't explain why his computers resources aren't all available to him. Also, occasionally there are 2 boot devices and a different boot logo. Weird stuff in his BIOS, etc.
I need to find an expert who can either confirm his suspicion or tell him he's obsessing over things that aren't there. I don't know where to turn. I can't afford a PI and I have no proof any of this is happening. I'm scared for his mental health.
For reference, here are some things he's found:
Here's what we've noticed: 1. Our computers speakers will start buzzing or cracking at the same time. Computers are off and not connected together. At one point shortly before this started, we noticed one computer's sound was messed up and the headphones speakers were configured as a mic. This suddenly fixed itself. 2. Random network traffic that is not shown on the Task Manager view of the Ethernet connector. It seems to happen only if League of Legends is open. The RM shows a spike but the TM shows nothing. 3. We noticed that one computers internal SATA ports were configured as external SATA ports. 4. Strange things in the BIOS that weren't there before like a Windows ToGo device, a Linux device, even after flashing the BIOS. It seems like it posts twice. TPM settings popped up after re-flashing. 5. Lots of Bluetooth services with seemingly random letters and numbers after them that we can't change settings for or disable. We don't have Bluetooth devices on our computers. 6. NFC and Payment service on a PC? 7. strange hash files and GPU cache 8. Hyper-V services we didn't install 9. Running traceroute to anywhere, the first hop is always "*" 10. Network boot settings we can't change. 11. Routers Firewall blocking weird packets and weird firewall settings we haven't added in windows firewall. 12. Unspecified TCP connections and loopbacks in the resource monitor.
I'm well aware of how crazy it sounds, but I'm absolutely desperate.
submitted by RobotAnxietyAttack to computerhelp [link] [comments]

The importance of being mindful of security at all times - nearly everyone is one breach away from total disaster

This is a long one - TL;DR at the end!

If you haven't heard yet: BlankMediaGames, makers of Town of Salem, have been breached which resulted in almost 8 million accounts being leaked. For most people, the first reaction is "lol so what it's just a game, why should I really care?" and that is the wrong way to look at it. I'd like to explain why everyone should always care whenever they are part of a breach. I'd also like to talk about some ways game developers - whether they work solo or on a team - can take easy steps to help protect themselves and their customers/players.
First I'd like to state that there is no practical way to achieve 100% solid security to guarantee you'll never be breached or part of a breach. The goal here will be to get as close as possible, or comfortable, so that you can rest easy knowing you can deal with problems when they occur (not if, when).

Why You Should Care About Breaches

The sad reality is most people re-use the same password everywhere. Your email account, your bank account, your steam account, your reddit account, random forums and game websites - you get the idea. If you haven't pieced it together yet the implication is that if anyone gets your one password you use everywhere, it's game over for you - they now own all of your accounts (whether or not they know it yet). Keep in mind that your email account is basically the holy grail of passwords to have. Most websites handle password changes/resets through your email; thus anyone who can login to your email account can get access to pretty much any of your accounts anywhere. Game over, you lose.

But wait, why would anyone want to use my password? I'm nobody!

It doesn't matter, the bad guys sell this information to other bad guys. Bots are used to make as much use of these passwords as possible. If they can get into your bank they might try money transfers. If they get into your Amazon account they might spin up $80,000 worth of servers to mine Bitcoin (or whatever coin is popular at the time). They don't care who you are; it's all automated.
By the way, according to this post (which looks believable enough to be real) this is pretty much how they got into the BMG servers initially. They checked for usernames/emails of admins on the BMG website(s) in previous breach dumps (of which there are many) and found at least one that used the same password on other sites - for their admin account!
If you want to see how many of your accounts are already breached check out Have I Been Pwned - I recommend registering all of your email addresses as well so you get notified of future breaches. This is how I found out about the Town of Salem breach, myself.

How You Can Protect Yourself

Before I go into all the steps you can (and should) take to protect yourself I should note that security is in a constant tug of war with convenience. What this means is that the more security measures you apply the more inconvenienced you become for many tasks. It's up to you to decide how much is too much either way.
First of all I strongly recommend registering your email(s) on https://haveibeenpwned.com/ - this is especially important if your email address is associated to important things like AWS, Steam developer account, bank accounts, social media, etc. You want to know ASAP when an account of yours is compromised so you can take steps to prevent or undo damage. Note that the bad guys have a head start on this!

Passwords

You probably need to have better password hygiene. If you don't already, you need to make sure every account you have uses a different, unique, secure password. You should change these passwords at least once a year. Depending on how many accounts you have and how good your memory is, this is your first big security vs convenience trade-off battle. That's easily solved, though, by using a password manager. You can find a list of password managers on Wikipedia here or you can search around for some comparison articles.
Some notable choices to consider:
Regardless of which one you choose, any of them is 100x better than not using one at all.

Multi-Factor Authentication / Two-Factor Authentication (aka MFA / 2FA)

The problem with all these passwords is that someone can still use them if they are found in a breach. Your passwords are only as strong as the website you use them on. In the case of the BMG breach mentioned above - all passwords were stored in an ancient format which has been insecure for years. It's likely that every single password in the breach can be reversed/cracked, or already have been. The next step you need to take is to make it harder for someone else to login with your password. This is done using Multi-Factor Authentication (or Two-Factor Authentication).
Unfortunately not every website/service supports MFA/2FA, but you should still use it on every single one that does support it. You can check which sites support MFA/2FA here or dig around in account options on any particular site. You should setup MFA/2FA on your email account ASAP! If it's not supported, you need to switch to a provider that does support it. This is more important than your bank account! All of the big email providers support it: GMail, Outlook.com, Yahoo Mail, etc.
The type of MFA/2FA you use depends on what is supported by each site/service, but there is a common approach that is compatible on many of them. Most of them involve phone apps because a phone is the most common and convenient "thing you have" that bad guys (or anyone, really) can't access easily. Time-based One-time Password or TOTP is probably the most commonly used method because it's easy to implement and can be used with many different apps. Google Authenticator was the first popular one, but it has some limitations which continue the security vs convenience battle - namely that getting a new phone is a super huge chore (no backup/restore option - you have to disable and setup each site all over again). Many alternatives support cloud backup which is really convenient, though obviously less secure by some measure.
Notable choices to consider:
Some sites/services use their own app, like Blizzard (battle.net) and Steam, and don't allow you to use other ones. You will probably have a few apps on your phone when all your accounts are setup, but it's worth it. You'll definitely want to enable it on your password manager as well if you chose a cloud-based one.
Don't forget to save backup codes in an actual secure location! If you lose your backup codes and your auth app/physical key you will be locked out of accounts. It's really not fun recovering in that situation. Most recommendations are to print them and put in a fireproof safe, but using some other secure encrypted storage is fine.
There is such a thing as bad MFA/2FA! However, anything is at least better than nothing. A lot of places still use SMS (text messaging) or e-mail for their MFA/2FA implementation. The e-mail one has the most obvious flaw: If someone gets into your email account they have defeated that security measure. The SMS flaws are less obvious and much less likely to affect you, but still a risk: SMS is trivial to intercept (capture data over the air (literally), clone your SIM card data, and some other methods). Still, if you're not a person of interest already, it's still better than nothing.

What Does This Have To Do With GameDev?

Yeah, I do know which subreddit I'm posting in! Here's the section that gets more into things specific to game development (or software development in general).

Secure Your Code

Securing your code actually has multiple meanings here: Securing access to your code, and ensuring your code itself is secure against exploitation. Let's start with access since that's the easier topic to cover!
If you're not already using some form of Source Control Management (SCM) you really need to get on board! I'm not going to go in depth on that as it's a whole other topic to itself, but I'll assume you are using Git or Mercurial (hg) already and hosting it on one of these sites (or a similar one):
First, ensure that you have locked down who can access this code already. If you are using private repositories you need to make sure that the only people who have access are the people who need access (i.e. yourself and your team). Second, everyone should have strong passwords and MFA/2FA enabled on their accounts. If 1 person on the team does not follow good security practices it puts your whole project at risk! So make sure everyone on the team is following along. You can also look into tools to do some auditing and even automate it so that if anyone's account becomes less secure over time (say they turned off MFA one day) they would automatically lose their access.
Additionally you should never commit secrets (passwords, API keys, tokens, social security numbers, etc) to your code repository. Probably 90% of cases where people have their AWS/Google Cloud/Azure accounts compromised and racking up huge bills for bitcoin mining is due to having their passwords/keys stored in their git repo. They either accidentally made it public or someone got access to the private repo through a compromised account. Never store sensitive information in your code repository!
Next topic: Securing your code from vulnerabilities. This one is harder to talk about for game dev as most engines/frameworks are not as susceptible (for lack of a better word) to these situations as others. In a nutshell, you need to keep track of the following:
A lot of these things cannot be solved automatically, unfortunately, but some of it can. If you are using Javascript for your game you likely will be using packages from npm - luckily they (recently) added security auditing for packages. For other languages you can look at tools like Snyk or some other alternatives to audit the libraries you use in your project. Unfortunately none that I know of are aimed at game dev in particular, but it's still important to use these tools when you can. In general, be aware of all of your code dependencies and what impact they can have on your game or your customers if there are security bugs. Impact can range from "can cheat in multiplayer" to "can get IP addresses of all players in the world" or even "can get all information I ever put on my server", etc.
In general you'll want to look into Secure Software Development Lifecycle (commonly SDLC) practices. Microsoft has some information on how they do it.

Secure Your Computer

I'm not going to go in depth on this one because at this point everyone should have a handle on this; if not there are limitless articles, blogs, and videos about the how/what/why. In summary: Keep everything updated, and don't open suspicious links.

Secure Your Website

I will have to add more to this later probably, but again there are tons of good articles, blogs, and videos on these topics. Hopefully the information in this section is enough to get you on the right track - if not feel free to ask for more info. Lots of guides can be found on Digital Ocean's site and they are relevant even if you don't use DO for your servers.
A lot of this will apply to your game servers as well - really any kind of server you expect to setup.

That's it, for now

I ran out of steam while typing this all up after a couple hours, but I may revisit it later to add more info. Feel free to ask any questions about any of these topics and I'll do my best to answer them all.

TL;DR (y u words so much??)

... in general... in general... in general... I sure wrote those 2 words a lot.

Why Should I Trust This Post?

Hopefully I have provided enough information and good links in this post that you can trust the contents to be accurate (or mostly accurate). There is certainly enough information to do some searches on your own to find out how right or wrong I might be about these things.
If you want my appeal to authority answer: I've been working at a major (network/computer) security company for almost 7 years as a software developer, and I've had to put up with pretty much every inconvenience brought on by security. I've also witnessed the aftermath of nearly every type of security failure covered in this post, via customers and the industry at large. None of the links I used are related to my employer or its products.
Edit: Fixed some typos and added some more links
More edit: added a few more points and links
submitted by exoplasm to gamedev [link] [comments]

I literally have tens of thousands of dollars in top-shelf hardware, looking to repurpose some before selling on eBay to build a NAS system, possibly a dedicated firewall device as well. o_O

Q1) What will you be doing with this PC? Be as specific as possible, and include specific games or programs you will be using.**

A1) This will be a dedicated NAS system for my home network. As such, I'm looking to have it:

- Host ##TB's of 720, 1080 & up resolution Movies and TV Shows I'm about to begin ripping from a MASSIVE DVD & Blueray collection I have.

- My kids are big on Minecraft. I understand it's possible to host your own "worlds" (or whatever they call the maps you can build) on your own "server". I think it would be pretty neat to offer them (& their friends - if can be done 'safely/securely') their own partition on one of my NAS HDD's.

- I also have accounts with a couple diff VPN companies... I understand it's possible (?) to sync said VPN's with a NAS, this might be a more relative topic on the next point/purpose...

- I'd like to be able to remotely link to this NAS for when I travel overseas and want to stream at my temp location from my house/this NAS.
______________________
Q2) What is your maximum budget before rebates/shipping/taxes?**

* A2) Here's where I make matters more complicated than most others would... I've been an advocate for Bitcoin and crypto-currencies in general since 2013. I invested in a small mining outfit back in 2014 (strictly Bitcoin/ASIC's). One of my buddies is the President of a large-scale mining operation (foreign and domestic) and he convinced me to dabble in the GPU mining-space. I made my first hardware purchase in Q4, 2017 and launched a small-scale GPU-Farm in my house since then. I had the rigs mining up until Q3 of 2018 (not cost-efficient to keep on, especially living in SoFlo) and since then, the hardware's been collecting dust (& pissing off my family members since they lost access to 3X rooms in the house - I won't let anyone go near my gear). One of my New Years Resolutions for 2019 was to clear out the house of all my mining equipment so that's all about to go up on eBay. So "budget" is relative to whatever I "MUST" spend if I can't repurpose any of the parts I already have on hand for this build... (Anyone having something I "need" and is looking to barter for one of the items I'll list later on in here, LMK).
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Q3) When do you plan on building/buying the PC? Note: beyond a week or two from today means any build you receive will be out of date when you want to buy.**

A3) IMMEDIATELY! :)
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Q4) What, exactly, do you need included in the budget? (ToweOS/monitokeyboard/mouse/etc\)**

A4) Well I had a half-assed idea approximately 1 year ago that it might be wise to build a bunch of 'gaming rigs' to sell on eBay with my intended repurposed mining hardware so I went on a shopping spree for like 6 months. That said; I've got a plethora of various other components that aren't even unboxed yet. 90% of the items I've purchased for this additional project were items that were marked down via MIR (mail-in-rebates) & what-not...
AFAIK, there are only 3X items I absolutely do not have which I 'MUST' find. Those would be - 1) Motherboard which accepts "ECC RAM". 2) CPU for said MOBO. 3) Said "ECC RAM".\* 
______________________
Q5) Which country (and state/province) will you be purchasing the parts in? If you're in US, do you have access to a Microcenter location?**

A5) I'm located in Southwest Florida. No Microcenter's here. Best Buy is pretty much my only option although I am a member of Newegg, Amazon & Costco if that makes any difference?
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Q6) If reusing any parts (including monitor(s)/keyboard/mouse/etc), what parts will you be reusing? Brands and models are appreciated.**

A6) In an attempt to better clean up this Q&A, I'm going to list the items I have on-hand at the end of this questionnaire in-case passers-by feel like this might be a TLDR.* (Scroll to the bottom & you'll see what I mean).
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Q7) Will you be overclocking? If yes, are you interested in overclocking right away, or down the line? CPU and/or GPU?**

A7) I don't think that's necessary for my intended purpose although - I'm not against it if that helps & FWIW, I'm pretty skilled @ this task already (it's not rocket science).
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Q8) Are there any specific features or items you want/need in the build? (ex: SSD, large amount of storage or a RAID setup, CUDA or OpenCL support, etc)**

A8) As stated in A4; ECC RAM is non-negotiable... RAID seems like a logical application here as well.

- This will predominantly be receiving commands from MacOS computers. I don't think that matters really but figured it couldn't hurt to let you guys know.\*

- I'd also be quite fond of implementing "PFSENSE" (or something of that caliber) applied to this system so I could give my Netgear Nighthawks less stress in that arena, plus my limited understanding of PFSENSE is that it's ability to act as a firewall runs circles around anything that comes with consumer-grade Wi-Fi routers (like my Nighthawks). Just the same, I'm open to building a second rig just for the firewall.\*

- Another desirable feature would be that it draws as little electricity from the wall as possible. (I'm EXTREMELY skilled in this arena. I have "Kill-A-Watts" to test/gauge on, as well as an intimate understanding of the differences between Silver, Gold, Platinum and Titanium rated PSU's. As well as having already measured each of the PSU's I have on-hand and taken note of the 'target TDP draw' ("Peak Power Efficiency Draw") each one offers when primed with X amount of GPU's when I used them for their original purpose.\*

- Last, but not least, sound (as in noise created from the rig). I'd like to prop this device up on my entertainment center in the living room. I've (almost) all of the top-shelf consumer grade products one could dream of regarding fans and other thermal-related artifacts.

- Almost forgot; this will be hosting to devices on the KODI platform (unless you guys have better alternative suggestions?)
______________________
Q9) Do you have any specific case preferences (Size like ITX/microATX/mid-towefull-tower, styles, colors, window or not, LED lighting, etc), or a particular color theme preference for the components?**

A9) Definitely! Desired theme would be WHITE. If that doesn't work for whatever reason, black or gray would suffice. Regarding "Case Size". Nah, that's not too important although I don't foresee a mini-ITX build making sense if I'm going to be cramming double digit amounts of TB in the system, Internal HDD's sounds better than a bunch of externals plugged in all the USB ports.
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Q10) Do you need a copy of Windows included in the budget? If you do need one included, do you have a preference?**

A10) I don't know. If I do need a copy of Windows, I don't have one so that's something I'll have to consider I guess. I doubt that's a necessity though.
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**Extra info or particulars:*\*

AND NOW TO THE FUN-STUFF... Here's a list of everything (PARTS PARTS PARTS) I have on-hand and ready to deploy into the wild &/or negotiate a trade/barter with:

CASES -
Corsair Carbide Series Air 540 Arctic White (Model# Crypto-Currency-9011048-WW) - (Probably my top pick for this build).
Cooler Master HAF XB EVO (This is probably my top 1st or 2nd pick for this build, the thing is a monster!).
Cooler Master Elite 130 - Mini ITX - Black
Cooler Master MasterBox 5 MID-Tower - Black & White
Raidmax Sigma-TWS - ATX - White
MasterBox Lite 5 - ATX - Black w/ diff. Colored accent attachments (included with purchase)
NZXT S340 Elite Matte White Steel/Tempered Glass Edition
EVGA DG-76 Alpine White - Mid Tower w/ window
EVGA DG-73 Black - Mid Tower w/ window (I have like 3 of these)

______________________
CPU's -
***7TH GEN OR BELOW INTEL's ("Code Name Class mentioned next to each one)**\*
Pentium G4400 (Skylake @54W TDP) - Intel ARK states is "ECC CAPABLE"
Celeron G3930 (Kaby Lake @ 51W TDP) - Intel ARK states is "ECC CAPABLE" :)
i5 6402P (Skylake @65W TDP) - Intel ARK states is "NOT ECC CAPABLE" :(
i5 6600k (Skylake @ 91W TDP) - Intel ARK states is "NOT ECC CAPABLE" :(
i7 6700 (Skylake @ 65W TDP) - Intel ARK states is "NOT ECC CAPABLE" :(
i7 7700k (Kaby Lake @ 95W TDP) - Intel ARK states is "NOT ECC CAPABLE" :(


***8TH GEN INTEL's **\*
i3-8350K (Coffee Lake @91W TDP) - Intel ARK states is "ECC FRIENDLY" :)
I5-8600K (Coffee Lake @95W TDP) - Intel ARK states is "NOT ECC CAPABLE" :(


***AMD RYZEN's **\*
Ryzen 3 2200G
Ryzen 5 1600
Ryzen 7 1700X

______________________
MOTHERBOARDS -

***7TH GEN AND BELOW INTEL BASED MOBO'S - **\*
MSI Z170A-SLI
ASUS PRIME Z270-A
ASUS PRIME Z270-P
ASUS PRIME Z270-K
EVGA Z270 Stinger
GIGABYTE GA-Z270XP-SLI
MSI B150M ARCTIC
MSI B250M MICRO ATX (PRO OPT. BOOST EDITION)

***8TH GEN INTEL BASED MOBO'S - **\*
EVGA Z370 FTW
GIGABYTE Z370XP SLI (Rev. 1.0)
MSI Z370 SLI PLUS


***AMD RYZEN BASED MOBO'S - **\*
ASUS ROG STRIX B350-F GAMING
MSI B350 TOMAHAWK
MSI X370 GAMING PRO
ASROCK AB350M PRO4
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RAM -

Way too many to list, nothing but 4 & 8GB DDR4 sticks and unfortunately, none are ECC so it's not even worth mentioning/listing these unless someone reading this is willing to barter. At which time I'd be obliged to send an itemized list or see if I have what they're/you're specifically looking for.\*
______________________
THERMAL APPLICATIONS/FANS -
JUST FANS -
BeQuiet -
Pure Wings 2 (80mm)
Pure Wings 2 (120mm)
Pure Wings 2 (140mm)
Silent Wings 3 PWM (120mm)

NOCTUA -
PoopBrown - NF-A20 PWM (200mm) Specifically for the BIG "CoolerMaster HAF XB EVO" Case
GREY - NF-P12 Redux - 1700RPM (120mm) PWM
Corsair -
Air Series AF120LED (120mm)

CPU COOLING SYSTEMS -
NOCTUA -
NT-HH 1.4ml Thermal Compound
NH-D15 6 Heatpipe system (this thing is the tits)

EVGA (Extremely crappy coding in the software here, I'm like 99.99% these will be problematic if I were to try and use in any OS outside of Windows, because they barely ever work in the intended Windows as it is).
CLC 240 (240mm Water-cooled system
CRYORIG -
Cryorig C7 Cu (Low-Profile Copper Edition*)

A few other oversized CPU cooling systems I forget off the top of my head but a CPU cooler is a CPU cooler after comparing to the previous 3 models I mentioned.
I almost exclusively am using these amazing "Innovation Cooling Graphite Thermal Pads" as an alternative to thermal paste for my CPU's. They're not cheap but they literally last forever.

NZXT - Sentry Mesh Fan Controller
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POWER SUPPLIES (PSU's) -
BeQuiet 550W Straight Power 11 (GOLD)

EVGA -
750P2 (750W, Platinum)
850P2 (850W, Platinum)
750T2 (750W, TITANIUM - yeah baby, yeah)

ROSEWILL -
Quark 750W Platinum
Quark 650W Platinum

SEASONIC -
Focus 750W Platinum
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STORAGE -
HGST Ultrastar 3TB - 64mb Cache - 7200RPM Sata III (3.5)
4X Samsung 860 EVO 500GB SSD's
2X Team Group L5 LITE 3D 2.5" SSD's 480GB
2X WD 10TB Essential EXT (I'm cool with shucking)
+ 6X various other external HDD's (from 4-8TB) - (Seagate, WD & G-Drives)
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Other accessories worth mentioning -
PCI-E to 4X USB hub-adapter (I have a dozen or so of these - might not be sufficient enough &/or needed but again, 'worth mentioning' in case I somehow ever run out of SATA & USB ports and have extra external USB HDD's. Although, I'm sure there would be better suited components if I get to that point that probably won't cost all that much).
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Needless to say, I have at least 1X of everything mentioned above. In most all cases, I have multiples of these items but obviously won't be needing 2X CPU's, Cases, etc...

Naturally, I have GPU's. Specifically;

At least 1X of every. Single. NVIDIA GTX 1070 TI (Yes, I have every variation of the 1070 ti made by MSI, EVGA and Zotac. The only brand I don't have is the Gigabyte line. My partners have terrible experience with those so I didn't even bother. I'm clearly not going to be needing a GPU for this build but again, I'm cool with discussing the idea of a barter if anyone reading this is in the market for one.

I also have some GTX 1080 TI's but those are already spoken for, sorry.

It's my understanding that select CPU's I have on this list are ECC Friendly and AFAIK, only 1 of my MOBO's claims to be ECC Friendly (The ASROCK AB350M PRO4), but for the life of me, I can't find any corresponding forums that confirm this and/or direct me to a listing where I can buy compatible RAM. Just the same, if I go w/ the ASROCK MOBO, that means I'd be using one of the Ryzens. Those are DEF. power hungry little buggers. Not a deal-breaker, just hoping to find something a little more conservative in terms of TDP.


In closing, I don't really need someone to hold my hand with the build part as much as figuring out which motherboard, CPU and RAM to get. Then I'm DEFINITELY going to need some guidance on what OS is best for my desired purpose. If building 2X Rigs makes sense, I'm totally open to that as well...
Rig 1 = EPIC NAS SYSTEM
Rig 2 = EPIC PFSENSE (or the like) DEDICATED FIREWALL

Oh, I almost forgot... The current routers I'm using are...
1X Netgear Nighthawk 6900P (Modem + Router)
1X Netgear Nighthawk X6S (AC 4000 I believe - Router dedicated towards my personal devices - no IoT &/or Guests allowed on this one)
1X TP-Link Archer C5 (Router). Total overkill after implementing the Nighthawks but this old beast somehow has the best range, plus it has 2X USB ports so for now, it's dedicated towards my IoT devices.
---- I also have a few other Wi-Fi routers (Apple Airport Extreme & some inferior Netgear's but I can only allocate so many WiFi Routers to so many WiFi channels w/out pissing off my neighbors) On that note, I have managed to convince my neighbors to let me in their house/WiFi configuration so we all have our hardware locked on specific, non-competing frequencies/channels so everyone's happy. :)


Please spare me the insults as I insulted myself throughout this entire venture. Part of why I did this was because when I was a kid, I used to fantasize about building a 'DREAM PC' but could never afford such. To compensate for this deficiency, I would actually print out the latest and greatest hardware components on a word document, print the lists up & tape to wall (for motivation). I was C++ certified at the age of 14 and built my first PC when I was 7. At the age of 15 I abandoned all hope in the sector and moved on to other aspirations. This entire ordeal was largely based off me finally fulfilling a childhood fantasy. On that note = mission accomplished. Now if I'm actually able to fulfill my desires on this post, I'm definitely going to feel less shitty about blowing so much money on all this stuff over the last couple years.

TIA for assisting in any way possible. Gotta love the internets!


THE END.
:)

EDIT/UPDATE (5 hours after OP) - My inbox is being inundated with various people asking for prices and other reasonable questions about my hardware being up for sale. Not to be redundant but rather to expound on my previous remarks about 'being interested in a bartetrade' with any of you here...

I did say I was going to sell my gear on eBay in the near future, I also said I wanted to trade/barter for anything relative to helping me accomplish my OP's mission(s). I'm not desperate for the $$$ but I'm also not one of those people that likes to rip other people off. That said; I value my time and money invested in this hardware and I'm only willing to unload it all once I've established I have ZERO need for any of it here in my home first. Hence my writing this lengthy thread in an attempt to repurpose at least a grand or two I've already spent.

One of the most commonly asked questions I anticipate receiving from interested bodies is going to be "How hard were you on your hardware?" Contrary to what anyone else would have probably done in my scenario which is say they were light on it whether they were or weren't, I documented my handling of the hardware, and have no problem sharing such documentation with verified, interested buyers (WHEN THE TIME COMES) to offer you guys peace of mind.

I have photo's and video's of the venture from A-Z. I am also obliged to provide (redacted) electricity bill statements where you can correlate my photo's (power draw on each rig), and also accurately deduct the excess power my house consumed with our other household appliances. Even taking into consideration how much (more) I spent in electricity from keeping my house at a constant, cool 70-72F year-round (via my Nest thermostat). Even without the rigs, I keep my AC @ 70 when I'm home and for the last 1.5-2 years, I just so happened to spend 85% of my time here at my house. When I would travel, I'd keep it at 72 for my wife & kids.
Additionally; I had each GPU 'custom' oveunderclocke'd (MSI Afterburner for all GPU's but the EVGA's).*
I doubt everyone reading this is aware so this is for those that don't.... EVGA had the brilliant idea of implementing what they call "ICX technology" in their latest NVIDIA GTX GPU's. The short(est) explanation of this "feature" goes as follows:

EVGA GPU's w/ "ICX 9 & above" have EXTRA HEAT/THERMAL SENSORS. Unlike every other GTX 1070 ti on the market, the one's with this feature actually have each of 2/2 on-board fans connected to individual thermal sensors. Which means - if you were to use the MSI Afterburner program on one of these EVGA's and create a custom fan curve for it, you'd only be able to get 1/2 of the fans to function the way intended. The other fan simply would not engage as the MSI Afterburner software wasn't designed/coded to recognize/ communicate with an added sensor (let alone sensor'S). This, in-turn, would likely result in whoever's using it the unintended way having a GPU defect on them within the first few months I'd imagine... Perhaps if they had the TDP power settings dumbed down as much as I did (60-63%), they might get a year or two out of it since it wouldn't run as near as hot, but I doubt any longer than that since cutting off 50% of the cooling system on one of these can't be ignored too long, surely capacitors would start to blow and who knows what else...
(Warning = RANT) Another interesting side-note about the EVGA's and their "Precision-X" OveUnderclocking software is that it's designed to only recognize 4X GPU's on a single system. For miners, that's just not cool. My favorite builds had 8X and for the motherboards that weren't capable of maintaining stable sessions on 8, I set up with 6X. Only my EVGA Rigs had 3 or 4X GPU's dedicated to a single motherboard. Furthermore, and as stated in an earlier paragraph, (& this is just my opinion) = EVGA SOFTWARE SUCKS! Precision X wasn't friendly with every motherboard/CPU I threw at it and their extension software for the CLC Close-Loop-Cooling/ CPU water-coolers simply didn't work on anything, even integrating into their own Precision-X software. The amount of time it took me to finally find compatible matches with that stuff was beyond maddening. (END RANT).
Which leads me to my other comments on the matter. That's what I had every single 1070 ti set at for TDP = 60-63%. Dropping the power load that much allowed me to bring down (on average) each 1070 ti to a constant 110-115W (mind you, this is only possible w/ "Titanium" rated PSU's, Platinum comes pretty damn close to the Titanium though) while mining Ethereum and was still able to maintain a bottom of 30 MH/s and a ceiling of 32 MH/s. Increasing the TDP to 80, 90, 100% or more only increased my hashrates (yields) negligibly, like 35-36 MH/s TOPS, which also meant each one was not only pulling 160-180W+ (Vs. the aforementioned 115'ish range), it also meant my rigs were creating a significantly greater amount of heat! Fortunately for the GPU's and my own personal habits, I live in South Florida where it's hot as balls typically, last winter was nothing like this one. Increasing my yields by 10-15% didn't justify increasing the heat production in my house by >30%, nor the added electricity costs from subjecting my AC handlers to that much of an extra work-load. For anyone reading this that doesn't know/understand what I'm talking about - after spending no less than 2-3 hours with each. and. every. one. I didn't play with the settings on just one and universally apply the settings to the rest. I found the 'prime' settings and documented them with a label-maker and notepad. Here's the math in a more transparent manner:

*** I NEVER LET MY GPU's BREACH 61C, EVER. Only my 8X GPU rigs saw 60-61 & it was the ones I had in the center of the build (naturally). I have REALLY high power fans (used on BTC ASIC MINERS) that were sucking air from those GPU's which was the only way I was able to obtain such stellar results while mining with them. **\*
Mining at "acceptable" heat temps (not acceptable to me, but most of the internet would disagree = 70C) and overclocking accordingly brings in X amount of yields per unit. =
'Tweaking' (underclocking) the GPU's to my parameters reduced my yield per unit from -10-15%, but it SAVED me well over 30-35% in direct electricity consumption, and an unknown amount of passive electricity consumption via creating approximately 20%+ less heat for my AC handler to combat.

I say all this extra stuff not just for anyone interested in mining with their GPU's, but really to answer (in-depth) the apparent questions you people are asking me in PM's. Something else that should help justify my claims of being so conservative should be the fact I only have/used "Platinum and Titanium" rated PSU's. Heat production, power efficiency and longevity of the hardware were ALWAYS my top priority.* . I truly thought Crypto would continue to gain and/or recover and bounce back faster than it did. If this project had maintained positive income for 12 months+, I'd have expanded one of our sites to also cater to GPU mining on a gnarly scale.

Once I have my NAS (& possibly 2nd rig for the firewall) successfully built, I'll be willing/able to entertain selling you guys some/all of the remaining hardware prior to launching on eBay. If there's something you're specifically looking for that I listed having, feel free to PM me with that/those specific item(s). Don't count on an immediate response but what you can count on is me honoring my word in offering whoever asks first right of refusal when the time comes for me to sell this stuff. Fortunately for me, PM's are time-stamped so that's how I'll gauge everyone's place in line. I hope this extra edit answers most of the questions you guys wanted to have answered and if not, sorry I guess. I'll do my best to bring light to anything I've missed out on after I realize whatever that error was/is. The only way anyone is getting first dibs on my hardware otherwise is if they either offer compelling insight into my original questions, or have something I need to trade w/.

THE END (Round#2)


submitted by Im-Ne-wHere to buildapcforme [link] [comments]

A slightly overboard response to my threat model.

For what I hope are obvious reasons, I don't want, and probably will never post my threat model publicly online. However, regardless of that, what I'm sure you will extrapolate from this post is that I live my life, digitally in particular, with a fairly high level threat model. This is not because I'm some super sophisticated criminal mastermind, but rather, I am at this level because I genuinely love playing around with this stuff. And I just happen to understand the importance of privacy and just how vital it is to a truly healthy society. I would like to extend a thanks to ProgressiveArchitect for the sharing of the knowledge they have done on this subreddit, /privacytoolsio, and the like. We may have never interacted, but nevertheless, your input into this community is truly interesting and extremely informative and educating. I'm sure those of you familiar with PA's setup will be able to draw some parallels with mine and their's.
Thank you.
I hope you all enjoy reading this write up.
I run Qubes OS on a Lenovo ThinkPad X230 laptop. Specs for it are as following: - i7-3520M - 16GB RAM - 1TB Samsung 860 Evo SSD - Qualcomm Atheros AR9285 wireless card
Additionally, I used a Raspberry Pi Model 3B+ and a Pomono SPI clip to replace the stock BIOS firmware with coreboot+me_cleaner. This wasn't done out of any "real" concern for the Intel ME (though of course proprietary black-boxes like it should be avoided at all costs and not trusted), but rather for open source enthusiasm and for increased security and faster boot times than what the stock BIOS firmware allows for. On that note about the ME, I don't believe the conspiracy theories that claim that it is a state-sponsored attack method for surveillance. I believe that Intel had good intentions for improving the lives of IT professionals who need to manage hundreds, if not thousands of remote machines. However, it has proven time and time again to be insecure, and I don't need the remote management and the "features" that it provides on my machines.
In Qubes, I use a combination of AppVMs and StandaloneVMs for a variety of different purposes. All VMs use PVH over HVM, except for the Mirage Unikernel Firewall, which uses PV, and the sys-net and sys-usb StandaloneVMs which have to use HVM because of PCI device passthrough. Right now most of my VMs are AppVMs, but for maintenance and compartmentalization reasons, I am considering moving more towards StandaloneVMs, despite the increase in disk space and bandwidth usage for updates.
General route of from Qubes to the Internet for anonymous browsing, general private browsing, accessing Uni services, and Uni-related anonymous browsing respectively: 1. Qubes->sys-mirage-firewall->sys-vpn-wg->sys-corridor->sys-whonix->whonix-ws-15-dvm to the internet. 2. Qubes->sys-mirage-firewall->sys-vpn-wg to the Internet. 3. Qubes->sys-mirage-firewall->uni-vpn-wg to the Internet. 4. Qubes->sys-mirage-firewall->uni-vpn-wg->uni-corridor->uni-whonix->uni-anon-research to the Internet.

(Note: the VPN name is substituted in the "vpn" above. I had to remove it to comply with this subreddit's rules. It is easy to identify what VPN it is as it randomly generates a long numaric string and has fantastic support for WireGuard.)

Web Browsers: - Tor Browser (primary) in a disposable Whonix VM. - Firefox (secondary) with the about:config changes listed on privacytools.io and the following extensions: Cookies AutoDelete, Decentraleyes, HTTPS Everywhere, uBlock Origin (advance user, all third party content blocked and JavaScript disabled), and Vim Vixen. Used in my personal AppVM. - Ungoogled Chromium (Uni only) with standard uBlock Origin and cVim. Used only for Uni-related access in my uni-campus and uni-home AppVMs.
Search Engine: SearX, Startpage, and DuckDuckGo.
Password Manager: KeePassXC.
Office: LibreOffice.
Notes: Standard Notes.
Messaging: Signal Desktop.
Media Playback: mpv.
Emails: I access my personal email within my personal Qubes domain and my Uni email using my Uni Qubes domains. My emails are downloaded to a local repository using isync, send using msmtp, and read using neomutt with html emails converted to plain text using w3m. Emails are sent in plain text too. All of the attachments in the emails (PDFs mostly) are automatically opened in DisposableVMs.
My personal Posteo email account has incoming encryption setup. This means that I emailed my public GPG key to an address correlated to my actual Posteo email address so that all email that I receive is encrypted with my public key and can only be decrypted using my private key. So even if my emails were intercepted and/or my account broken into, the contents of them are safe since they are encrypted as soon as they hit Posteo's servers.
I have setup a number of Posteo aliases that are completely segregated from the email I used to register my account. One of those is considered my "professional" email for my current job. I have another couple aliases, one dedicated for 33mail and another dedicated for Abine Blur. I make use of 33mail alias addresses for catch-all email addresses for registering for accounts that need to be under a username associated with my name anyways. This is for purposes like putting different compartmentalized, but still related emails to put onto my Resume. I use a different alias for each Resume I put out online. That way, when that information gets sold, traded, etc., I can easily trace it back to who sold the information. For example, if I applied for a job online that required me to go through the process of registering an account through a third-party, say 'xyz Inc', the address I would register that account with would be [email protected], or something along those lines. Abine Blur is used much in the same manner but for accounts that don't need to be associated with my real name in any way, say online shopping on Amazon that I do under an many aliases, then ship to various address that I don't live at, but that I can visit with no problems. I use a different Blur address with each service like with 33mail for the same reasoning shown above.
The passwords for the accounts are encrypted and stored locally in each of the domains, however, my private key is stored in my vault domain, so even if an adversary were to compromise the domains, they wouldn't be able to steal my private key without exploiting the hypervisor. They would only be able to wait for me to authorize the usage of my private key in that domain, and even then, it could only be used to decrypt files. That is a concern that they can use my private key to decrypt messages, but they wouldn't be able to steal the key. With my personal email, the emails would also be encrypted locally anyway so they wouldn't be able to read them. My Uni email, in contrast, uses Outlook unfortunately, so there isn't any option to enable incoming encryption, and even if it was, I'm not sure how private it would be anyways.
For those looking for an in depth list of all my VMs, with explanations for the more obscure ones, I have listed them below. I have got a lot of templates, hence why I am considering moving over to StandaloneVMs, but as of right now:

Templates:

StandaloneVMs:

AppVMs:

Phone: Motorola Moto G5s running Lineage OS 16.0 Pie no G-Apps or micro-G with the following Apps: - AdAway: Open Source hosts file-based ad blocker. (Requires root.) - AFWall+: Linux iptables front end. (Requires root.) - Amaze: File manager. - andOPT: 2FA app. I like it since it can export the entries to an AES encrypted file. - AntennaPod: Podcast manager. - AnySoftKeyboard - Simple Calendar - Simple Contacts Pro - DAVx5: CalDav syncronization with my calendar on my Posteo email account. - F-Droid - Fennec F-Droid: Web Browser. Has the same Firefox addons like on Qubes minus Vim Vixen. I used the app Privacy Settings to configure the about:config. - KeePassDX: Password manager. - KISS launcher - Magisk Manager - NewPipe: YouTube app replacement. - S.Notes: Standard Notes. - OsmAnd~: Maps and navigation. - Red Moon: Blue light filter. - SELinuxModeChanger: Exactly as it sounds. (Requires root.) - Shelter: Work profile manager. - Signal: Messaging. - Vinyl Music Player: Music player. - WireGuard: VPN protocol frontend. Is configured to use my VPN account. Is setup as an always-on and connected VPN.
As mentioned, I use Shelter to manage my work profile. In it I isolate the following apps: - Clover: *chan browser. - Orbot: For routing apps through Tor. Is setup as an always-on and connected VPN. - RedReader: Reddit client. - Tor Browser
Over the last several years, I have started using my phone less and less and taking advantage of less of what it has got to offer. I don't check email on my device. I have no real need to browse the Internet on it outside of watching videos using NewPipe, browsing Reddit, and various *chan boards.
On the Smart Phone side of things, I am considering purchasing an older used iPhone SE or 6S for use with MySudo when outside of my home as well as an iPod Touch for use on WiFi only for use inside my home. The iPhone would be kept inside of a faraday bag when I am at home and not using it. It would also be kept in the faraday bag whenever at home to avoid associating that device with my home address. The iPod Touch would be used for MySudo calls instead.
Future outlook and plan for my privacy and security:
To avoid as much deanonymisation of my privacy as possible, I'm only going to specify enough so that anyone reading this can get the jist of my situation in life. I am quite young (age 16 to 25) and I started along this privacy journey when I was even younger. I was never a very heavy social media user, however I did have an online presence if you looked hard enough. My name fortunately is a very common and short name, so that does help to bury information that I was not able to remove further in the vast trenches that is the Internet.
On the digital side of things, I mentioned that I have a dedicated Crypto AppVM for handling crypto currency transactions using Bisq. I have setup a dedicated bank account that I have periodically been transferring money into so that I can trade crypto. Unfortunately, I do not live in the US, so being able to effectively start trades with others is more difficult. I also do not have access to a credit card masking account like privacy.com (that I absolutely would use given the ability). I plan on getting an anonymous VPS to host my own Tor exit node for better speeds and to mitigate the possibility of malicious exit nodes. The country I live in has been a proponent of absolute dragnet surveillance on all activities occurring online and in real life, though the former is far more visible on this subreddit. I will be using crypto with cleaned Bitcoin (as seen with ProgressiveArchitect's setup) for purchasing my VPN service, etc.
With future hardware, to replace my aging laptop, I am very hopeful for Xen, then eventually Qubes OS getting ported to Power9. When that happens I'll be getting a Raptor Computing Blackbird as a desktop. Maybe in the future I'll get a Purism Librem laptop, but for now my corebooted X230 works perfectly for my use cases. On that note, I have successfully build the Heads firmware for the X230 and I was able to get the minimal 4MB image flashed on my laptop. I did revert it back to my coreboot setup after playing around a little with it, and unfortunately I haven't had time since to do a full, complete flash of it.
On the physical/real life side of things, I plan on making use of various Trusts in order to hold assets, say to keep my name from being immediately visible on the title of my car. As of right now I am fortunate enough to have the title of my car under the name of someone who I trust. Unless I am legally required, and where there are immediate and absolute consequences, I use fake names in real life. With Uni, I am enrolled under my real name and address. This is a requirement and it is verified, so there is nothing that I can realistically do about it. As for other services, I plan on setting up a personal mailbox (PMB), etc if possible to use as a real, physical address that is associated with my real name and that is used for things like Government issued ID. In the future when I move again, I plan on renting a place in cash to try and keep my name dissociated with my real address. For those looking for reasoning on why one would want to do that, please read How to be Invisible by J.J. Luna. It's truly the Bible of physical privacy.
At this stage I am just going off on a ramble, so I should cut it short here.
I have just started and I live for this shit.
submitted by ComprehensiveAddict to privacy [link] [comments]

Is A Hack Like This Even Possible? I Might Actually Be Crazy.

For a year my husband and I have noticed a decrease in our computers performance. There's a lot we can't explain. We also have a friend who has the knowledge, resources, time and access to pull something like this off. Our theory is that he's using our computers to mine bitcoins with our resources without our knowledge. It has to be profitable to be going on this long. OR some of this stuff is perfectly explainable and were just extremely paranoid and delusional. It has literally effected our mental health and I'm terrified for my husband's well-being. Any help on this would be appreciated more than you know.
For those interested in what we think we've found here is a list: 1. Our computers speakers will start buzzing or cracking at the same time. Computers are off and not connected together. At one point shortly before this started, we noticed one computer's sound was messed up and the headphones speakers were configured as a mic. This suddenly fixed itself. 2. Random network traffic that is not shown on the Task Manager view of the Ethernet connector. It seems to happen only if League of Legends is open. The RM shows a spike but the TM shows nothing. 3. We noticed that one computers internal SATA ports were configured as external SATA ports. 4. Strange things in the BIOS that weren't there before like a Windows ToGo device, a Linux device, even after flashing the BIOS. It seems like it posts twice. TPM settings popped up after re-flashing. 5. Lots of Bluetooth services with seemingly random letters and numbers after them that we can't change settings for or disable. We don't have Bluetooth devices on our computers. 6. NFC and Payment service on a PC? 7. strange hash files and GPU cache 8. Hyper-V services we didn't install 9. Running traceroute to anywhere, the first hop is always "*" 10. Network boot settings we can't change. 11. Routers Firewall blocking weird packets and weird firewall settings we haven't added in windows firewall. 12. Unspecified TCP connections and loopbacks in the resource monitor.
He also used his card to buy our windows key and is an Enterprise user who uses Azure. Another theory is that he's registered as our OEM to install the software automatically that does this for him.
Is this even theoretically possible or should we seek out a doctor and start taking antipsychotics?
submitted by RobotAnxietyAttack to hacked [link] [comments]

Understanding BIP149, redeployment of Segwit with BIP8

I recently published BIP149 and would like to take a few moments to explain the details of this proposal.
BIP149 is a completely new deployment of segwit, which I propose if the current BIP9/BIP141/143/147 segwit deployment fails to lockin/activate by November 15th.
BIP149 cannot be run on mainnet now, and there is code in the reference implementation to prevent it from running. It is incompatible with the current segwit deployment on purpose to remove unnecessary complications.
Essentially, the idea is, if the current segwit deployment fails to activate by Nov 15th, we can release new software that has BIP149. This uses BIP8 to activate segwit by July 2018. Miners will still be able to trigger activation by 95% threshold signalling as normal. In the 8 months from November to July 2018, nodes will be able to upgrade to BIP149. If segwit is not MASF activated by July 2018, there will be enough of the economy running BIP149 that nodes can begin enforcement. What will actually happen is on the first retarget after July 4th, the BIP8 state machine will switch to LOCKED_IN status for two weeks, and then on the following retarget, ACTIVATION will occur. The rationale here is in 5 months we achieved 70% saturation of witness capable nodes, so by the time segwit timesout with all the urgency and demand people feel for segwit, we can expect them to upgrade at least as fast, if not much faster. I have spoken with a number of developers who think this is a reasonable assumption.
Background, I had hoped to be able to release a BIP that can be deployed concurrently now with segwit, but, there are various technical complications in implementing it cleanly and making it easily reviewable. I had various feedback from others in previous iterations and in order to get the widest support from developers especially concerned with predictable results and thus safety, I came to the conclusion that the BIP will get the widest support by not attempting any shortcuts and by removing all complexity. I know many people want segwit now, but, I think we should just bite the bullet and do it the BIP149 way. I already made a shortcut BIP with BIP148. I will discuss the pros and cons at the end.
Back to BIP149, this is a completely new redeployment with a new service bit NODE_UAWITNESS and new compact block protocol version - doing this avoids many gotchyas which I will explain below:
Currently, segwit capable nodes advertize the NODE_WITNESS service bit and preferentially peer with other NODE_WITNESS nodes. Post activation, segwit-active nodes will then know who they should relay witness blocks to and who they should relay old style stripped blocks to. The assumption is if I am a NODE_WITNESS node and segwit has activated, then other NODE_WITNESS nodes will also be segwit activated. We cannot reuse NODE_WITNESS because when BIP149 activates, they would believe non-BIP149 NODE_WITNESS nodes were also active. Using a new service bit, and effectively starting a new deployment as if the previous deployment doesnt exist, is the most predictable and trouble free way to go about it.
Additionally, BIP149 is compatible with existing mining software by reusing the "segwit" name and deployment chainparams (it's not possible to have two deployments with the same name, one expired and one pending/active, due to how versionbits is implemented). In short, if the current segwit deployment fails to activate, we can reuse parts to maintain compatibility, while changing the bare minimum to remove any conflicts with old nodes. It's clean, predictable and easy to review.
BIP148 IS NOT BIP149
Remember BIP148 is exceptional, it's NOT what a usual UASF BIP should look like. A normal UASF if effectively activation on a predetermined date in the future (a flag day). BIP8 combines BIP9 miner signalling with a flagday if MASF does not occur.
How is BIP149 different to BIP148? So BIP148 is a UASF which can be used in two ways. (a) The economy can run BIP148 and basically force miners to signal for segwit, thus activating the current segwit deployment. Or, (b) a majority of miners, 60% or so, could run it and censor other miners who do not signal segwit, thus causing the current segwit to deploy. In method (a) a chain split will occur if any miners do not upgrade, and given the fact there are always absentee miners and pool operators, this is quite likely. It's the economy vs hash power saying "if you dont signal, your blocks will not be worth anything because we will reject them". In the case of (b) you have a majority of hashpower, who could use their majority to orphan any non signalling miners. This isn't great but it's less disruptive than (a) because there is a majority hashpower definitely opted in.
BIP149 on the other had does not guarantee a chain split since that could only happen if a miner deliberately takes action to manually create a segwit invalid block, which would be rejected by the economy. The incentives are different also, with BIP148 a chainsplit comes for free, regardless of if it lasts long or not. In BIP149, a miner would have to specifically take action to split and waste their money, which they could do at any time anyway. BIP149 is uncontroversial in the sense it is just a redeployment with guaranteed activation at the end, for a soft fork we are fairly sure people want and will upgrade to. The evidence is everywhere. UASFs deployed over a long time and a decent flagday are perfectly safe - all soft forks are enforced by nodes, even if activation is triggered by hashpower.
Anyway, we've got 8 months from now to review and think about BIP149 - it cannot be deployed until November. If you would like to show support for BIP149, feel free to add the following to your bitcoin.conf
uacomment=UASF-SegWit-BIP149 
Note you can have multiple uacomments like:
uacomment=BIP8 uacomment=UASF-SegWit-BIP149 uacomment=UASF-SegWit-BIP148 
You can find the bitcoin.conf file here
You can also just add this to a shortcut - create a shortcut (or edit the existing one you use) and add this to the end: -uacomment=UASF-SegWit-BIP149
e.g. (just add the property to the end like this):
"C:\Program Files\Bitcoin\bitcoin-qt.exe" -uacomment=UASF-SegWit-BIP149 if you are using Windows.
You can also just add uacomments as multiple command line/shortcut arguments like
-uacomment=BIP8 -uacomment=UASF-SegWit-BIP149 -uacomment=UASF-SegWit-BIP148 
Then you can check here to see how your node is signalling at https://bitnodes.21.co/ will show something like: xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx:8333 /Satoshi:0.14.1(UASF-SegWit-BIP149)/
If your node has synced and doesn't show using the link above make sure to enable forwarding of port 8333 so you accept incoming connections (if you want to that is) - in your client: go into settings / network and tick enable incoming connections and use upnp. You might have to add it to your firewall if this doesn't work. [taken from this user comment].
Read the BIP https://github.com/bitcoin/bips/blob/mastebip-0149.mediawiki
See the implementation https://github.com/bitcoin/bitcoin/compare/master...shaolinfry:uasegwit-flagday
submitted by shaolinfry to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Let's Talk About Litecoin Nodes

I decided to write this up because there's a lot of confusion about what a "Node" is. I personally had to do a lot of research to figured this out myself. If anyone would like to suggest edits, I welcome them.
Due to the decentralized nature of Litecoin, sometimes key terms or definitions don’t get standardized. This is particularly problematic for newcomers who want to learn about Litecoin but get confused by variant vocabulary. For example, a Full Litecoin Node to one person may mean something slightly different to another. In light of this, below I suggest a list of terms to help the community use the same definitions and language in regards to Litecoin Nodes.

A Node

Before we talk about Litecoin Nodes, let’s talk about nodes in a broad sense. In a distributed network, the simplest way to define a node would be to say it is a point of intersection or connection with the network. It can act as both a redistribution point or a communication endpoint. This loose definition helps us better understand the different ways a Litecoin Node functions within the Litecoin Network. The following definitions should collectively be considered Litecoin Nodes.

A Full Node

A Full Litecoin Node is an integral component of the Litecoin Network because it validates the blockchain. It does this by downloading a copy of it. It is also capable of relaying transactions and recent blocks, but this isn’t required to be considered a Full Node. Now when you first open up a Full Node client like Litecoin Core, most people are sitting behind a firewall. In this case, your Full Node is limited in the number of connections it can connect to (around 8) and only looks for Super Nodes a.k.a. Listening Nodes. The reason for this is because your Full Node isn’t publicly connectable yet.

A Super Node a.k.a. Listening Node

In a distributed network, a Super Node functions as a highly connected redistribution point as well as a relay station. Therefore this would be an appropriate term to describe a publicly connectable Full Litecoin Node. This means many nodes can connect to it to obtain relayed transactional data and blockchain history. This may require more bandwidth and CPU than a Full Node because of all the extra work it’s doing. These Super Nodes are normally on 24/7 and are reliable focal points for other nodes to connect to. In order to activate this within a Litecoin client functioning as a node, you must make it publicly connectable. One way to do this is to bypass any potential firewalls and/or setup port forwarding. Some manuals suggest running litecoind(litecoin daemon) in the background instead of Litecoin-Qt, but this isn’t necessary.
u/aaron0791 Raspberry Pi guide can either be a super node or a full node depending on whether it is publicly connectable. You can run it with the litecoind as well in order to avoid setting up a GUI with the Raspberry Pi.

A Miner’s Node

Today, miners utilize mining programs separate from Litecoin Core to mine Litecoin blocks. Some miners choose to solo mine and therefore use their own Full Node to maintain a full copy of the blockchain via litecoind. Others choose to pool mine and work together to solve blocks. In this case, the admin of the pool maintains a Full Node while pool miners contribute their hashpower. A third method, though highly discouraged and harmful to the network, is to SPV mine by mining on top of blocks before fully validating them. These SPV pool miners typically trust another mining pool’s Full Node as a reference to build on top of. In light of this, a Miner’s Node can be further subcategorized as either a Solo Miner’s Full Node or a Pool Miner’s Full Node.

A Simplified Payment Verification(SPV) Client a.k.a. Thin Client a.k.a. Light Wallets

SPV clients like Loafwallet (the Litecoin App for smartphones) are not Full Nodes because they don’t download the blockchain. SPV clients do this by ensuring your transactions are put in a block and then confirm that other blocks are being added to it. Therefore in the loosest sense, an SPV Client may fit the criteria of a node. However, they don’t do much to support and validate the distributed trustless ledger of Litecoin. Instead, they store just copies of all the headers of all the blocks in the blockchain that are taken from other Super Nodes. Therefore, SPV clients are unable to verify any transactions in the chain because they don’t have access to it. In this way, they function as communication endpoints as they are are unable to relay transactions or blockchain data. Additionally, it is important to put your own full nodes behind them to securely use SPV clients as wallets.

Specialized “Edge Routing” Nodes

Other types of nodes exist where Full Nodes are stripped of its wallet and mining capabilities. Entities such exchanges and merchant payment processors then build on top of these specialized “edge routing” nodes.

Conclusion

Above, I’ve briefly described the various roles a Litecoin Node can have. I’ve also included a broad overview of the necessary steps a user would need to take to use Litecoin Core in these roles. Hopefully by providing this list of terminology, it will empower users to understand what exact role they are playing in the network and to inform them of the steps they can take if they want to play a different one.
edit: clarified my language after consulting bitcoin dev's.
edit2: source if you want visuals-> https://medium.com/the-litecoin-school-of-crypto/lets-talk-about-litecoin-nodes-77383339cdf7
edit3: tips appreciate
LbpHUTE3LSYMu25FumQZeKv2z8BrYUQP8x
submitted by ecurrencyhodler to litecoin [link] [comments]

Trouble with Mining Helper

A visual guide to opening ports to mine using Bitcoin 1776 software
https://imgur.com/a/gQqtpyw
This won't be a long (or sufficient tutorial) because this can become complex. The current BROADCAST block is 530515. However, an at home user has mined a PRIVATE block of 530517. In order for this to be accepted by the main chain, they must 'broadcast' their block.
This is easiest to do using a VPN type of service. One solution is:
https://www.supremevps.com/
And get their cheapest VPN offering 2 CPS / 2 RAM, and then manually request an upgrade to add 200 GB of storage.
Another option is:
https://zeronehosting.com/
They are a data hosting VPN service (by default) but their computers are so slow it will be challenging to mine, even at this very low setting.
Either option will run about $360 / year or $30 a month. The advantage of Supre is that they use Solid State Drives, which sync in about 2 days. Zerone uses Hard Disk Drives, which sync in about 2 weeks. Either option will work for hosting a full node, but only the first option will be reliable to mine with, which mines a block about every 2 hours (if you are diligent).
You can also mine from your Home Computer, but this is more challenging as you MUST open up port 6703. With a "Windows Server" machine, this is fairly simple but requires the added step of Configuring the firewall to permit Bitcoin 1776 connections to go in and out.
To check if your port is open, you can try:
http://ismyportopen.com/
Or
https://bitnodes.earn.com/
(not sure if this will work past the point of the fork)
This is the difference between a Listening Node and a Broadcast node. A listening node can be a full node, but will never transmit block data out. It only receives blocks in. It is unsearchable, unconnected to the network, beyond the IP addresses it manually enters (or is added to it via software, seed nodes). A broadcast node IS searchable, and every other node can connect to it. If you are doing this from your home computer, this can create the 'attack vector' of getting dos'd as your IP address is exposed. This is a remote risk, and not one I'd worry about, but something to be aware of. If you use a VPN service, it's not a problem.
You must run a full node to mine blocks.
Personally, I have not been successful (or maybe just barely after much trial) in opening up my home ports. However, there are two basic steps:
Configure Windows Firewall to allow Bitcoin 1776 to get in and out.
Configure your Router / Modem to allow Bitcoin 1776 or Port 6703 to be open and connected to the internet. This is typically referred to as "Port Forwarding" but sometimes "DMZ".
However, you can have other firewall type software, your ISP could block it, or something could go wrong and diagnosing the problem can become challenging.
OK, so if you have mined Bitcoin 1776 blocks and do NOT want to become de'synced from the network, you MUST broadcast those blocks to the network. If the network mines more blocks which are broadcast, then your blocks will become invalid. I will hold off on personal mining until Sunday or Monday to allow time for the private miner to attempt to open up their ports (obviously I can't prevent others from mining, but this may be a low risk).
If you become desyned from the network you can either wait until the network passes your blocks, in which your blocks will become orphaned (and you will not receive credit), or you can use the "invalidate" command to reset your blockchain to some specific point. As we currently do not have a public block explorer, this may become challenging, however you can easily invalidate up to the forked point, and then resync the last 15 blocks or so within minutes, once properly connected (sometimes this take several attempts, invalidating, revalidating, etc - but is a relatively fast process and can be accomplished within an hour or two).
How to resolve becoming desynced:
https://www.reddit.com/Bitcoin1776/comments/9bkybf/bitcoin_1776_software_ready_to_mine/e7431u6/
I will add some more tutorial language, but this should be enough to give you a starting point for diagnosing problems. Thank you,
Bitcoin 1776 Team
How to open up your ports (with a Windows Server computer this is easy, harder for a Personal Windows, home use machine):
https://www.wikihow.com/Open-Ports
Imgur Album
https://imgur.com/a/gQqtpyw
submitted by Bitcoin1776 to Bitcoin1776 [link] [comments]

Step by step in staking Redd with Raspberry Pi 3

Before I start, I would like to pay complete credits to these two guys :)
https://www.reddcointalk.org/topic/2679/reddcoin-staking-via-ubuntu-mate-on-raspberry-pi-3-model-b-march-2018 (most of my steps, if not all, are from this link)
https://github.com/joroob/reddcoin/blob/mastedoc/build-arm.md
All the steps I am writing is ABSOLUTELY NECESSARY, please don't try to skip it because I did, and it doesn't work.
step 1: get a Raspberry Pi B https://www.raspberrypi.org/products/#buy-now-modal
step 2: make sure you get proper power supply 5v 2A - the Pi will mine, it will need sufficient power. Regular USB samsung charger will not work.
step 3: get proper micro SD card (SanDisk for example) 32Gb++
step 4: USB + Mouse keyboard
step 5: flash micro SD card with Ubuntu MATE
Download Ubuntu Mate image: https://ubuntu-mate.org/raspberry-pi/
Download Etcher: https://etcher.io
After finishing downloading, use Etcher to write/flash the image on micro SD card
After this, your SD card contains Ubuntu MATE OS.
step 6: Place SD Card into Raspberry Pi 3 and start it up. You should be able to see Ubuntu OS! Congrats!
step 7: Connect to wifi or internet cable (internet is better and faster)
step 8: OPTIONAL - turn off UI OS, so that things will work faster
Open XTerminal:
sudo systemctl disable lightdm.service (to turn UI off) 
in case you want to turn UI on again, run this:
sudo systemctl start lightdm.service (to turn UI on) 
step 9: install all dependencies
sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install git build-essential libqt4-dev libprotobuf-dev protobuf-compiler libtool autotools-dev autoconf libssl-dev libboost-all-dev wget pkg-config sudo add-apt-repository ppa:bitcoin/bitcoin sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install db4.8 sudo apt-get install libminiupnpc-dev sudo apt-get install libqrencode-dev Reboot 
step 10: add additional RAM (sort of) in case the App need it, this is call "Create Swap file"
sudo fallocate -l 1G /swapfile sudo chmod 600 /swapfile sudo mkswap /swapfile sudo swapon /swapfile echo ‘/swapfile none swap sw 0 0’ | sudo tee -a /etc/fstab 
step 11: Build Berkeley Database
wget http://download.oracle.com/berkeley-db/db-4.8.30.NC.tar.gz tar xfvz db-4.8.30.NC.tar.gz cd db-4.8.30.NC cd build_unix ../dist/configure --enable-cxx make sudo make install 
step 11.5: Set BerkeleyDB path
export CPATH="/uslocal/BerkeleyDB.4.8/include" export LIBRARY_PATH="/uslocal/BerkeleyDB.4.8/lib" export LD_LIBRARY_PATH=/uslocal/BerkeleyDB.4.8/lib/ 
step 12: Build Reddcoin Wallet
---download source code ---- only source from joroob/reddcoin will work because some stweak was needed for ARM CPU
cd ~ git clone https://github.com/joroob/reddcoin.git 
---build reddcoin ----
cd reddcoin ./autogen.sh ./configure --with-gui=no --disable-tests cd src make sudo make install 
If you finish this, you are in a great position!!!
step 13: Create reddcoin configuration file
cd ~ mkdir .reddcoin && cd .reddcoin nano reddcoin.conf rpcuser=YOUR OWN USERNAME, YOU DONT NEED TO REMEMBER THIS, MAKE IT AS LONG AS YOU WANT rpcpassword=YOUR OWN PASS WORD, YOU DONT NEED TO REMEMBER THIS, MAKE IT AS LONG AS YOU WANT 
step 14: Use bootstrap
(At this point, you had a running reddcoin daemon, now you can start staking. But syncing the full chain takes long time.)
cd ~/.reddcoin wget https://github.com/reddcoin-project/reddcoin/releases/download/v2.0.1.2/bootstrap.dat.xz xz -d bootstrap.dat.xz 
step 15: start the reddcoin daemon service cd ~/reddcoin/src ./reddcoind -daemon
After this, you can test if the daemon is working, by perform this command: ./reddcoin-cli getblockcount
step 16: if your app is not able to sync, it is probably the firewall issue with OS, run this to allow port 45444 (used by Reddcoin) and redo step 15
sudo iptables -I INPUT 1 -i eth0 -p tcp --dport 45444 -j ACCEPT sudo iptables -A OUTPUT -p tcp --dport 45444 -j ACCEPT 
step 17: open BEER and enjoy! This is a MUST or the daemon will stop working! I am not kidding!
step 18: Actually, i forgot to mention you need to execute this command for the wallet to stake:
reddcoind walletpassphrase $yourpassword 9999999 true 
ADDITIONAL REMARKS:
From my PC: I am using putty to execute the command, winSCP to monitor the file location on raspberry.
Moving Red Coins out of exchange really a big move, start with normal wallet, don't start with this tutorial :) Ever since I move my coins out of exchange, I am free from all of the ups and downs! Really!
So guys and gals, Redd On!
UPDATE 18 Mar: my first stake has arrived after 6 days staking :)
In case you want to tip me: RaF3TeWqgTzAdnaZQffnsxS74dag13zsAY
Edit 1: Format stuff
Edit 2: Add step 18 to execute staking command.
Edit 3: In case you don't want to compile the source code, you can download my compile version here: https://github.com/hieplenet/reddcoin/releases/tag/v2.0.0.0 (but doing this, you should be aware of the risk of me changing source code for my benefit - I don't change any thing, but you should be cautious, this is the internet :) )
submitted by hieplenet to reddCoin [link] [comments]

Full English Transcript of Gavin's AMA on 8BTC, April 21st. (Part 2)

Part 1
Part 3
Raw transcript on Google Docs (English+Chinese): https://docs.google.com/document/d/1p3DWMfeGHBL6pk4Hu0efgQWGsUAdFNK6zLHubn5chJo/edit?usp=sharing
Translators/Organizers: emusher, kcbitcoin, nextblast, pangcong, Red Li, WangXiaoMeng. (Ranked in alphabetical order)
18. sina
Q: 1) Hello, what's a better strategy for bitcoin holders if it hard forks at 75%? Is it worth holding of the coins in the minority chain? Or better selling them? Will the value of coins in the majority chain be weakened or reinforced? Thank you
A: 1) BIP109 does not hard fork at 75%, it hard forks 28 days after 75% has been reached-- so when the hard fork happens, there should be almost zero hash power on the minority chain. So there will not be a minority chain.
If I am wrong and blocks are created on the minority chain, people plan to get enough hash power to replace those blocks with empty blocks, so it is impossible to make any transactions on the minority chain.
Q: 2) if Bitcoin split into two chains, will it cause panic in the market, then the overall market capitalization fell?
A: 2) Bitcoin split into two chains accidentally in March of 2013, and there was panic selling -- the price dropped from $48 to $37 within a few hours. But the mining pools very quickly agreed on which branch of the chain they would support, the problem was resolved within a day, and a week later the price was over $60.
That shows the strength of consensus and incentives-- the mining pools did what was best for Bitcoin because that is what is best for themselves in the long term.
Q: 3) Now it requres 60-70G space for a full node wallet, also it takes severals days for synchronization. Technically, Is it possible in the future that a full node wallet only cost a little space and can be quickly synchronized? (Do not use light wallets and other third party wallets)
A: 3) You can run a pruned node that does not store the full block chain today (I’m running six right now on inexpensive servers around the world to test some new code).
It is technically possible to get fast synchronization without giving up any trust, but it would require miners do more work (they would have to compute and store and validate an “unspent transaction output committment hash” in the block chain). There are also schemes that would give you fast synchronization at a lightweight-wallet level of trust, but worked towards no trust if you were connected to the network for long enough.
Some developers say that you are not really using Bitcoin unless you run a full node, but that is wrong. Bitcoin was designed so that you can make the choice of speed and convenience versus trust. You give up very, very little trust if you run a lightweight wallet that supports multisignature transactions, and I think that is what most people should be running.
Q: 4) What do you think about Ethereum? Can Bitcoin achieve all the same functions claimed by Ethernet? Thank you
A: 4) I think most of the interesting things you can do with Ethereum you can also do with multi-signature Bitcoin transactions. I haven’t seen a really great use of Ethereum yet, and I think there will be a big problem with Ethereum smart contracts that are designed to steal people’s money, because very few people will have the skill necessary to tell if a complicated smart contract is correct.
I’m watching the rootstock.io project, which brings Ethereum contracts to Bitcoin.
Q: 5) Is it possible that Nakamoto may still participate in the development of Bitcoin by a pseudonym? What is the last time he contact you? Will he be back?
A: 5) Yes, it is possible. I tell reporters who ask me about Satoshi:
The idea of Bitcoin is important; who invented it is an interesting mystery, but I think it should remain a mystery until whoever invented it decides to step forward. We should respect Satoshi's privacy.
Q: 6) Now some government can prevent people from accessing foreign information using technical method(like the Great Firewall), people need to get across the wall first if they want to know information abroad. So technically speaking, is it possible that the government could block and damage the usage of bitcoin? If it is, is there any method to get across the wall?
A: 6) If a government controls network access into and out of their country (like the Great Firewall), they could easily block connections to and from today’s Bitcoin peer-to-peer network. Connections are not encrypted in any way, and most connect to port 8333, which would be easy to block.
However, blocking connections inside the country would be much harder. And it only takes one encrypted or satellite or microwave or laser connection that bypasses the firewall to get around the blockage and get blocks and transactions flowing across the border again.
I think governments that decide they don’t like Bitcoin are more likely to pass laws that make it a crime to use a currency other than the official government currency to pay for things.
Q: 7) You insist on hard fork at 75%, while Chinse Mining Pools insist at 90%. So it may be easier to get support from China If Classic changes to 90%. Have you ever considered to communicate with Chinese mine pool( such as convening a meeting) to reduce differences?
A: 7) Yes, I was in Beijing a few weeks ago to better understand what some of the Chinese mining pools are thinking. It was a productive meeting, and I look forward to communicating more with them soon.
Q: 8) How will halving and block size increasing impact the bitcoin price in your opnion? Thanks.
A: 8) The price, today, is a reflection of confidence. If people think Bitcoin will be valuable in the future, they are willing to buy it and hold it.
Everybody knows the halving will happen, so, theoretically, that should not affect today’s price.
I believe that increasing the block size limit would be very good for the price, because Bitcoin is more valuable the more people who are able to use it.
Q: 9) Technically, bitcoin should also have drawbacks. Some disadvantages may be improved in the future , while some may be difficult to improve. What are those shortcomings for bitcoin to hard to improve in your opinon? Are you an optimist thinking that all technical shortcomings are temporary, and they will all likely to be improved in the future?
A: 9) Every successful technology is full of shortcomings. It is always easier to look backwards and see your mistakes. Smart engineers are very good at working around those shortcomings, and wise engineering managers know when to work around a shortcoming to remain compatible with the existing technology and when it makes sense to break compatibility because eliminating a shortcoming would have large benefits.
Q: 10) If there is a kind of altcoin in the future goes beyond Bitcoin, it must has the advantage Bitcoin can not have, right? Conversely, if Bitcoin itself evolves fast, improves and adds new features, it will be difficult to be surpassed and eliminated, right? What does Bitcoin scalability and evolution capability look like?
A: 10) People are funny -- I can imagine an altcoin that has no technology advantages over Bitcoin, but some people prefer it for some reason. I live in a town where a lot of people care a lot about the environment, and I could imagine them deciding to use a “GreenCoin” where all miners must be inspected regularly and must use only solar power.
I think many engineers tend to over-estimate the importance of new features, and under-estimate the importance of reliability, convenience and reputation.
Satoshi designed Bitcoin to be very scalable, and to be able to evolve. I think the best way for any technology to scale and evolve is competition -- make the technology open, and let companies or teams compete to build the most reliable, convienent and secure products. That looks like (and is!) a very messy, chaotic process, but it produces better results, faster, than a single person or team deciding on on approach to solving every problem.
Q: 11) If R3 succeeds, will it challenge bitcoin in transnational remittances?
A: 11) Maybe -- if banks involved in R3 could make it very convenient to get money into and out of their blockchain. They might not be able to do that because of regulations, though. But I don’t know much about the international remittance market and what regulations the banks will have to deal with.
Q: 12) Can blockchain only be secured by mining? Some private blockchain do not have mining property, are they really blockchain?
A: 12) Security is not “yes it is secure” or “no it is not secure.” Proof of work (mining) is the most secure way we know of to secure a blockchain, but there are less secure methods that can work if less security is OK. And less security is OK for some private blockchains because if somebody cheats, they can be taken to court and money can be recovered.
Q: 13) Will public chain, private chain and R3 chain coexist for a long time? Or only one chain survive finally? What is the relationship among Bitcoin block chain, private chains and R3 chain , complementary or competitive? Will Bitcoin block chain eventually win?
A: 13) My guess is all of the “blockchain for everything” excitement will die down in a year or two and a lot of people will be disappointed.
Then a few years later there will be blockchains for everything, running quietly inside stock markets and currency exchanges and lots of other places. Some of them will use the Bitcoin blockchain, some of them won’t, and nobody besides blockchain engineers will care much.
Throughout it all, I think it is most likely Bitcoin continues to grow, hopefully with less drama as it gets bigger and more mature.
Q: 14) Some people think that it is difficult for the outside world to understand the technical details if lightning network is controlled by blockstream or another company, resulting in technological centralization, what’s your opinion?
A: 14) I don’t worry about that, the lightning protocol is being designed in the open as an open standard. It is complicated, but not so complicated only one person or company can understand it.
Q: 15) What is the procedure Bitcoin Core modify the rules? Take the 2M hard fork proposal as an example, I saw there are concerns that if one of the five core developers who have write access reject the proposal will be rejected. So If happens, does that mean the launch hard ford in July will be abandoned? What is percentage of agreement in Core developers to write code for such a major bifurcation matter like 2M hard fork? Are there any specific standards? Or the lead developer has the final decision?
A: 15) That is a good question for the current active Core developers. When I was the lead developer, I would make a final decision if a decision needed to be made.
19. JR13
Q: What do you think about the future of increasing bitcoin block size limit?
A: It will happen sooner or later -- almost everybody agrees it must happen. I am still working to make it happen sooner, because the longer it takes, the worse for Bitcoin.
20. vatten
Q: What decision making process you think should be used for future bitcoin development?
A: For example, WuJiHan's proposition of service providers and mining pools collecting individual mineuser opinion. Or, a non-profit making standard making committee like IEEE, consists of people with enough expertise in bitcoin and economy, finance?
I think we should look at how development of other very successful technologies works (like email or the http protocol). I am not an expert, but open standards and open processes for participating in creating standards that are either adopted by the market or not (like the IETF process) seem to work the best.
21. kcb
Q: From my experience on Reddit, people now start to understand that evil is not Blockstream/Core's intention. They simply have a very different vision on how Bitcoin network should be running and on how future development should be heading. They do whatever they can to protect their vision, even dirty tricks, because they feel they are bringing justice.
Similarly, in Chinese community, we do see the same situation. Many Chinese Bitcoiners that showed strong enthusiasm in the past differ with each other. This even happens among my own real-life friends.
My question is: How can we separate these two groups of people who have widely divergent visions? Bitcoin cannot proceed when carrying two totally different visions.
A: I don’t know! It is always best if everybody is free to work on their own vision, but for some reason some people seem to think that the block size limit will prevent big companies from taking over Bitcoin.
I think all they will accomplish is making the technology much more complicated. And big companies are much better able to deal with and control highly complicated technologies.
22. XRP
Q: Please share your comments on ripple, Mr. Guru.
A: I haven’t paid very much attention to Ripple- the last time I looked at it was probably two years ago. Back then I thought they would have trouble with governments wanting to regulate their gateway nodes as money transmitters, but I haven’t even taken the time to see if I was right about that.
23.Lory
Q: Hi Gavin, I think you had a disagreement with the Nakamoto roadmap in Bitcoin design. Can you explain why? Thank you.
A: I assume you mean the part where Satoshi says he doesn’t think a second implementation will ever be a good idea.
I just think Satoshi was wrong about that-- if you look at very successful protocols, they all have multiple compatible implementations. We understand a lot more about what it takes to be completely compatible and have much better tools to ensure compatibility. And the fact that there now are multiple compatible implementations working on the network (btcd being probably the best example) shows both that it is possible and that the other implementations are not a menace to the network.
24. HuoDongFaBu
Q: 1) For the dispute between Core and Classic, can we refer to the theory of “Common-pool resources” (Commons) in the Western cultural tradition to understand and grasp the public and neutral property of bitcoin so at to strive for a solution which can balance interests of all parties?
A: 1) Maybe. The blockchain could be considered a Commons today-- a common, limited resource. But if control of the block size limit was given to miners, then I don’t think it fits the definition any more, because miners would have the freedom to restrict its use however they saw fit, on a block-by-block basis. That is just a simple, pure market, with transaction creators on one side and miners on the other.
Q: 2) For the application requring "bitcoin multi-signature script", can you recommend any programming language, libraries or tools?
A: 2) BitPay has some good tools: https://github.com/bitpay/bitcore I haven’t worked on any multisignature applications since writing the low-level protocol code-- there are probably other great libraries and tools that I just don’t know about.
25. zhuoji
Q: Hello Gavin, are you now still developing Classic? Will Classic proceed? Would you give up Classic and return to Core?
A: Yes, yes, and there is no “return to” -- I plan on contributing to lots of projects.
26. jieke
Q: 1) If there are one million entrepreneurs who require fund and asset securitization via block chain technology, is it possible?
A: 1) If there are ten million investors willing to fund those entrepreneurs, sure it is possible. The technology won’t be a problem, one million is not a large number for today’s computers.
Q: 2) Why can we trust Bitcoin and what are the advantages of bitcoin in online payment and settlement? Its commission fee now is not as cheap as before, besides, the time for one confirm is not fast enough. Your opinions on pros and cons of Mining and PoW?
A: 2) For people in places with good-enough banking systems like the United States or China, purchasing things inside their own country, bitcoin does not have much of an advantage over existing payment systems. But if you are buying something from somebody in another country, or you live in a place where there are no good payment systems, Bitcoin works very well.
Proof of work and mining is the most fair, decentralized way to distribute new coins. They are also the best way of securing the network that we know of so far. Perhaps in 30 years when essentially all of the new coins have been mined and computer scientists have thoroughly studied other ways of securing the network it might make sense for Bitcoin to start to switch to something other than mining and proof-of-work to secure the network.
Q: 3) How likely the possibility of replacing the existing legal currency with virtual currency?
A: 3) Very unlikely in a large country. I can imagine a small country that uses a larger country’s currency deciding to switch to a crypto currency, though.
27. IMJENNIM
Q: 1) You have always insist on larger block. Some people share the same view, they just want to increase the block size, regardless of network bandwidth restrictions in China and other developing countries. How do you see this criticism?
A: 1) Most people are using Bitcoin over very limited bandwidth connections-- most people use lightweight wallets.
If you run a business that needs a fast connection to the Internet, then it is not expensive to rent a server in a data center that has very good bandwidth. Even inexpensive servers have plenty of bandwidth and CPU power to keep up with much higher transaction volume.
If you insist on running a full node from your home, average connection speed in China today is 3.7 megabits per second, which is almost 1,000 transactions per second. Latency through the Great Firewall is a bigger issue right now, but there are several software solutions to that problem that people (including myself) are working on right now.
Q: 2) In addition, I'm curious what is your opinion on the current Bitcoin Core team? There is no doubt? If so, why not act as a Core developer contributing code in Bitcoin Core to solve these problems?
A: 2) I like most of the people on the current Bitcoin Core team, they are great. But there are a couple of people on that team I don’t want to work with, so I have decided to limit the amount of time I spend with that project.
28.ShaSiKaEr
Q: 1) Hello Gavin, I would like to ask you how long since your last contribution in Bitcoin Core or others related? Expect the big influence as one of the earliest contributors, do not you think you ought to talk about the code, mostly for the coutribution of development of Bitcoin?
A from pangcong: 1)The last commit in bitcoin core made by Gavin is on September 30, 2015, after that Gavin was busy with bitcoin XT and bicoin classic. His actual development in bitcoin has never stopped, these records are very clear on github, if you want to ask questions which are obvious, please investigate first.
A from Gavin: 1) Also: I submitted some patches to Bitcoin Core a few days ago.
Q: 2) Also, you were a neutral software engineer before, seriously committed to improving the bitcoin. But now you're playing political means to enhance your impact on the future of Bitcoin, how do you respond with it?
A from KuHaiBian: 2) Now the biggest problem in Bitcoin is not block size limit, but that there is only one development team, it is as dangerous as the situation that there is only one mining pool mining bitcoin. This is the biggest problem Gavin is trying to solve.
A from Gavin: 2) I just give my honest opinion, and try to do what I can to make Bitcoin more successful.
29.Xseraph2
Q: There is no systematic process for Bitcoin upgrades. Is there any regulation/restriction on the power of Core devs? How do we balance the conflict between the centrilized power of the devs with interest of the community consensus? Do you think Bitcoin need to learn from R3 chains or distributed ledger systems? I.e. setting up regulations to constrain the power of the devs, so that only devs with “restricted access” can contribute, not everyone.
A: Competition is the best solution. If the Core team does not make their customers happy, then they will be replaced. It might take a year or more for another team to get the reputation for high-quality code that the Core team has acquired over the years.
30. ZhongBenCong
Q: In 2016, you propose to increase block size limit to 8M, then doubled every two years. Is it still the most promising expansion plan in your opinion now? If it is, do you think it possible that the block size reach 8GB in 2036, particularly given the network speed and bandwith in developing countries.
A: I think it would be best to eliminate the block size limit entirely, and let the miners decide if they should accept or reject blocks. The miners want Bitcoin to succeed, and will not choose a size so large the network cannot handle it.
I don’t know if people would agree to eliminate the limit, though. A dynamic limit that grows, but prevents an extremely large ‘attack block’ would also be a good solution.
The growing-8MB idea came from the idea that it should be possible for somebody on a home Internet connection to continue to validate every single transaction. However, more research showed that the bottleneck is not the connection from the Internet to our homes (even in China there is plenty of bandwidth there) but connections across international borders. In particular, the Great Firewall can sometimes greatly restrict bandwidth to and from China.
31. FengFengZhongXuYaoNi
Q: Gavin, hello! What is the reason do you think the community rejected Bitcoin XT?
A: It was a mistake to try to make more changes than just simply increasing the block size limit.
32. ShaSiBiEr
Q: Now the problem of block size limit is not so serious as before when Bitoin was attacked, and the Segwit has been deployed, so what is the controversy? Why have to argue to the bitter end, must we argue until bitcoin die? Gavin, we all know your contribution to Bitcoin. But in 2015, when you said in bitcoin software development, we need a "dictator" to resolve the dispute. I think you want to be this dictator. http://lists.linuxfoundation.org/pipermail/bitcoin-dev/2015-June/008810.html
A: Must we argue until bitcoin die: I think is is in the nature of people to argue, so I think we will be arguing about lots of things until either we die or Bitcoin dies. I think in a few years we will look back and wonder why there was so much arguing, but I also think some good things have come from all of the argument.
33. HuoDongFaBu
Q: 1) What do you think about Ethereum? Can smart contract run based on Bitcoin?
A: 1) (This question is repeated. Please see Q18-4)
Q: 2) What are the problems Miners may have to face after halving in July? Thanks!
A: 2) There is a small risk that the halving will make a good fraction of the miners stop mining, because they will get about half of the bitcoins they got before the halving. And that might mean blocks take longer to create, which means less space for transactions, which might mean people get frustrated and leave Bitcoin. Which could drop the price even more, causing more miners to stop mining, more frustration, and so on.
Miners tell me they have already planned ahead for the halving and this will not happen, which is why I think it is a small risk and I don’t think the halving will be a big problem for most miners.
Q: 3) Where can we get the whole code and code review of bitcoin?
A: 3)
Bitcoin Core is at: https://github.com/bitcoin/bitcoin
Bitcoin Classic: https://github.com/bitcoinclassic/bitcoinclassic
btcd: https://github.com/btcsuite/btcd
bitcore: https://github.com/bitpay/bitcore
submitted by kcbitcoin to btc [link] [comments]

Port 8333??

Long time lurker. This is my first post here. Please direct me elsewhere if it is not relevant to this subreddit.

I work for an IT services company and it's my first day on a new contract. I scanned their firewall with Nmap and realized port 8333 - bitcoin is filtered. The company doesn't use bitcoin in any way as far as I'm concerned. Does this mean someone is using it to mine?
submitted by supermicromainboard to sysadmin [link] [comments]

Lore v2 QT on Raspberry Pi

Hello,
 
To follow up to mindphuk's excellent piece on building the headless client on Raspberry Pi (https://www.reddit.com/blackcoin/comments/6gkjrw/wip_blackpi_a_stake_device_based_on_raspberry/), I thought if anyone was interested I'd show you how to get the full QT version running on the Pi on the Jessie with Pixel desktop. This works and has been soak tested for several days now on a standard Raspberry Pi 3. I have since added some coins and it stakes a handful of times a day.
 
Running staking Lore clients paves the way for some of the future use cases of BLK utilising the Bitcoin 0.12 (and newer) core tech, including colored coins. So I'm going to leave this one going indefinitely to kickstart the number of Lore clients staking. It's certainly not mandatory but it will be good in the longer term to have a nice distribution of Lore staking clients.
 
The cross-compile which lets you create binaries for multiple platforms didn't work for the QT version on the Pi, so there is more to do than just running the binary unfortunately, as below. There are folks working on some much cleaner solutions than this for the Pi, with a custom front end, and where you won't have to do any mucking about. That is coming soon. In the meantime, if you enjoy a fiddle with such things, here's how to get this QT client working on your Pi.
 
These instructions assume you are starting from scratch with a completely blank OS.
 
Download Jessie with Pixel from: http://downloads.raspberrypi.org/raspbian/images/raspbian-2017-07-05/2017-07-05-raspbian-jessie.zip
 
Note they have since (August 2017) released a version called 'Stretch' which does not work with this guide. I'll see if I can come up with something new for that at some point and link to it here when I have. In the meantime the guide should work with the Jessie image above.
 
Unzip the file and extract the .img file to burn it onto Fresh SD card to boot from (to be safe, use 16GB or larger), using a tool like win32diskimager or Etcher.
 
Assuming you have keyboard/mouse and monitor plugged into your pi, boot it up and the Jessie Desktop will show.
 
Before we do anything else, you should increase the default swap size on the pi, as compiling certain libraries can exhaust the RAM and get stuck otherwise. To do this, launch a Terminal window and type:
 
sudo nano /etc/dphys-swapfile 
 
and Change the CONF_SWAPSIZE from 100 to:
 
CONF_SWAPSIZE=1024 
 
Exit nano with control + x to write out the file.
 
Then, run the following to restart the swapfile manager:
 
sudo /etc/init.d/dphys-swapfile stop sudo /etc/init.d/dphys-swapfile start 
 
Now, launch the browser and download the Lore 2.12 binaries for ARM here: https://mega.nz/#!k2InxZhb!iaLhUPreA7LZqZ-Az-0StRBUshSJ82XjldPsvhGBBH4 (Version with fee fix from 6 September 2017)
 
(If you prefer to compile it yourself instead, it is possible by following the instructions in the original article by Mindphuk just taking into account this is the newer version of the Lore client than when that was written (https://github.com/janko33bd/bitcoin/releases) and the versions of Boost and the Berkeley DB need to be the same as below.)
 
Double click the zip and extract the Lore binary files. Yes, at the moment they are all called 'bitcoin', not 'blackcoin' or 'Lore' - this is because the code derives from a recent bitcoin core implementation so this has not yet been updated. You can place these wherever you like.
 
In the Terminal window, change directory to where you put the binaries, e.g.:
 
cd Downloads/lore-raspberrypi-armv7-jessie-pixel chmod +x * 
 
That marks the binaries as executable.
 
Now, we need the Boost libraries installed for any of the Lore binaries to work. The project was done with Boost 1.62.0. Unfortunately the Jessie repository only goes up to 1.55, so we need to download and build 1.62 manually on the device.
wget https://sourceforge.net/projects/boost/files/boost/1.62.0/boost_1_62_0.tar.gz/download tar -xvzf download cd boost_1_62_0 sudo ./bootstrap.sh sudo ./b2 install 
 
(This will take almost 2 hours. Have a nice cup of tea and a sit down.)
 
When I came to run the binaries, I found they couldn't find Boost. Running this command fixes that:
sudo ldconfig 
 
Now we are going to install the packages which aren't already included in the default OS installation which the binaries need in order to run:
sudo apt-get install qrencode libprotobuf-dev libevent-pthreads-2.0-5 
 
Now we need to install the Berkeley Database version 6.2.23. This is the version Lore v2 uses. Bitcoin still uses 4.8 which is 10 years old! This doesn't take too long.
wget http://download.oracle.com/berkeley-db/db-6.2.23.tar.gz tar -xvzf db-6.2.23.tar.gz cd db-6.2.23/build_unix ../dist/configure --prefix=/usr --enable-compat185 --enable-dbm --disable-static --enable-cxx 
 
I find this next section of the Berkeley instructions worked better just switching to root, which can be fudged by running sudo su before the rest:
sudo su make make docdir=/usshare/doc/db-6.2.23 install chown -v -R root:root /usbin/db_* /usinclude/db{,_185,_cxx}.h /uslib/libdb*.{so,la} /usshare/doc/db-6.2.23 
 
Now we're going to go up a couple of directories to where the binaries were:
cd ../.. 
 
Then run the client!
./bitcoin-qt 
 
And there you have it. Should hopefully end up looking a bit like this: http://imgur.com/a/eEHGa
 
Using the Bootstrap can save a while syncing. Download it at: https://www.reddit.com/blackcoin/comments/6b3imq/blackcoin_bootstrapdat_up_to_block_1631800
 
Place the bootstrap.dat file into the ~/.lore directory.
 
Run ./bitcoin-qt again, it will say 'Importing Blocks' rather than 'Synchronising with Network'. My pi sync'ed fully in about 5-6 hours.
 
If you want peace of mind that Lore will always start on bootup into the Jessie w/Pixel desktop (i.e. after a power cycle), then you need to create a .desktop file in the following place.
sudo nano ~/.config/autostart/Lore.desktop 
 
And in it, enter the following (tailoring the Exec line below to the whereabouts of your bitcoin-qt file):
[Desktop Entry] Name=Blackcoin Lore Comment=Mining without the waste Exec=/home/pi/Downloads/lore-raspberrypi-armv7-jessie-pixel/bitcoin-qt Type=Application Encoding=UTF-8 Terminal=false Categories=None; 
 
Power usage and payback time
 
After a good while leaving it going by itself, the CPU load averages got down to almost zero, all of the time. Idling, the Pi uses a bit less than 3 watts. This means it would take two weeks to use one 1Kw/h of electricity.
 
If you pay e.g. 12.5 cents a unit, that's what you'd expect this to cost to run in a fortnight. That's around $0.25 a month or $3 a year. Green and cheap and helping to secure the BLK network. I paid for the year's worth of electricity in 2 days staking with 25k BLK. Makes mining look silly, huh? ;)
 
Securing your Pi
 
With staking, your wallet needs to be unlocked and as such, the keys to your wallet are on the device. In a clean and newly installed environment as described above, and if you don't allow others to use your device and there is no other software or nasties running on it, there is no real cause for concern. However, there are some basic security precautions you can take.
 
Firstly, if you have enabled SSH and are playing with your pi across your LAN (or worse, the Internet), you should immediately change the password for the default 'pi' user (which is preconfigured to be 'raspberry'). Simply log in as normal, then type:
 
passwd 
 
You'll be prompted to enter the old and the new passwords.
 
Security by default
 
Your Pi is likely, by default, to not be exposed to incoming connections from the outside world because your router is likely generating a private address range for your LAN (192.168.x.x or 10.0.x.x or 172.x.x.x) which means all incoming connections are effectively blocked at the router anyway unless you set up a 'port forward' record to allow packets arriving on certain ports to be forwarded to a specific internal IP address.
 
As for accessing your Pi across the internet, if you have set up a port forward, this likely has security ramifications. Even basic old fashioned protocols have proven in recent times to have uncaught flaws, so it's always advisable to lock down your device as much as possible, and even if you only plan to access the Pi over your LAN, install a firewall to configure this. I used one called ufw, because it's literally an uncomplicated firewall.
 
sudo apt-get install ufw sudo ufw allow from 192.168.0.0/16 to any port 22 sudo ufw --force enable 
 
This allows just port 22 (SSH) to be open on the Pi to any device on my LAN's subnet (192.168.0.x). You can change the above to a single IP address if paranoid, or add several lines, if you want to lock it down to your LAN and a specific external static IP address (e.g. a VPN service you use). To find out what subnet your router uses, just type:
 
ifconfig 
 
and you'll see on the interface you are using (either hard wired or wifi) the 192.168 or 10. or 172. prefix. Change the above rule so it matches the first two octets correctly (e.g. 10.0.0.0/16 if you're on a 10.0. address).
 
You may already use VNC to access your Pi's desktop across your LAN, this uses port 5900. Add a line like above to lock it down to an internal address. It's not a good idea to expose this port to the wider world because those connections are not encrypted and potentially could be subjected to a MITM attack.
 
You can query the status of the firewall like this:
ufw status 
 
And of course, try connecting remotely once you change the rules to see what works. You should consult the official documentation for further options: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/UFW
 
Back up & Recovery
 
There are again many ways to tackle this so I'll just speak about my basic precautions in this regard. Don't take it as a be-all-and-end-all!
 
The wallet.dat file is the key file (literally) containing all the private/public keys and transactions. This can be found in:
 
~/.lore 
 
You can navigate there using Jessie w/Pixel's own file manager or in a terminal window (cd ~/.lore). You can copy this file or, if you'd rather keep a plain text file of all your public and private keys, use the 'dumpwallet' command in the console. In Lore, go to Help > Debug Window > Console and type 'dumpwallet myfilename' where myfilename is the file you want it to spit out with all your keys in it. This file will end up in the same place you launch bitcoin-qt from.
 
The instructions earlier on, when running Lore for the first time intentionally left out encrypting your wallet.dat file because in order for the wallet to stake upon startup, it needs to have a decrypted key already. This isn't perfect, but after a power cycle, it would never stake unless you left it decrypted. So the best practice here is as soon as the wallet.dat file has left your device, i.e. you copy it to a USB stick for example, put it in an encrypted folder or drive (or both).
 
In Windows, one way is to use Bitlocker drive encryption for the entire drive. You should follow the instructions here to encrypt your flash drive before your wallet.dat is on there, and don't forget the password!!
http://infosec.nmsu.edu/instructions-guides/how-to-enable-bitlocker-to-go-for-external-hard-drives-and-usb-flash-drives/
 
On the Mac, I use a software package called Concealer to encrypt files I store on the Mac itself: http://www.belightsoft.com/products/conceale   There are almost certainly free packages with similar functionality, I have just used that one for years.
 
Either way, if you want to just make sure your USB drive is encrypted, you can do so in one-click in Finder before you put the sensitive files on it: http://lifehacker.com/encrypt-a-usb-stick-in-finder-with-a-click-1594798016
 
Note that these disk encryption methods may mean having to access the USB stick on a PC or Mac in order to retrieve the files in the event of a disaster. Be aware this may mean exposing them to more security issues if your computer is in any way compromised or someone nefarious has access to your computer. There are more 'manual' ways of backing up and recovering, such as literally writing down private/public key pairs which this guide doesn't go into, but may suit you better if paranoid about your setup.
 
Recovery
 
The wallet.dat file has everything in it you need to recover your wallet, or if you used 'dumpwallet', the file you saved out has all the keys.
 
Wallet.dat method: Install Lore as normal then replace any auto-generated wallet.dat in ~/.lore directory with your backup. If a lot of time has elapsed and many transactions have occurred since your backup, launch lore with:
./bitcoin-qt -rescan 
 
And if that doesn't do the job, do a full reindex of the blockchain:
 
./bitcoin-qt -reindex 
 
If you used the dumpwallet command, install Lore then place the file containing all the keys that you saved out in the same directory as bitcoin-qt. In Lore, go to Help > Debug Window > Console and type 'importwallet myfilename' where myfilename is that file containing all the keys. The wallet should automatically rescan for transactions at that point and you should be good to go.
 
There are a million ways to do effective security and disaster recovery, but I hope this shows you a couple of basic precautionary ways. There are discussions about better ways to stake without compromising too much security which are happening all the time and developments in this regard will happen in time.
 
In the meantime, feel free to comment with your best practices.
 
submitted by patcrypt to blackcoin [link] [comments]

Why I think the mining problem/gpu pricing is not going to go away anytime soon.

In a semi recent pcper mailbag, Ryan Shrout explained his thoughts on when gpu pricing will go back to normal: https://youtu.be/HrFw37wi-Do?t=11m56s (and also this hardforum post https://hardforum.com/threads/nvidia-crypto-demand-for-gpus-very-strong-but-could-cool-in-december.1944501/ and I'm sure many many other posts out there)
I think it's going to be a loonng time. because before what ended the boom the two (iirc, this is the third time we've seen GPU cryptocurrency mining) times before, it was mainly based off of bitcoin, (and to a lesser extent litecoin) which is sha256, which is extremely ASIC-able (scrypt really isn't, but I don't think that was as major of a contribution to it as bitcoin), and what happened was that ASICs happened and just fucking decimated the GPUs in hashes/watt, so that made mining unprofitable with GPUs, because the difficulty just skyrocketed. And that's what is needed this time around too. something needs to happen for the difficulty of [any/all algorithms here] to increase to the point where it doesn't become profitable. and that's just not going to happen, at least for a solid 8 months, imo. Casual miners with a half dozen cards or so, will be able to make back their expenses, even electricity, assuming bitcoin stays around $4k. which is another factor: nicehash and bitcoin price. as long as bitcoin price stays high and people are getting paid in bitcoin, then we'll continue to do mine, because it doesn't matter that electricity is expensive, bitcoin is worth more, more than electricity is expensive.
Maybe when etherium switches to Proof of Stake, that will help the AMD GPU market, but, let's be honest, I'll be surprised if that happens before 2H2018, and there's just so many algorithms to hash. just because one is unprofitable (like sha256 is now), there's literally dozens more to choose from.
There needs to be a global crash of cryptocurrency for miners to not snatch up GPUs at above MSRP. And, tbh, I'm not sure what would make that happen, since the blockchain is literally designed to be really really damn hard to censor. if China decides, for some stupid reason (just as a thought experiment, they won't actually do it imo), to just straight up block all the ports that bitcoin/litecoin/etherium/zcash communicate on, by the great firewall of china, two things would happen: there'll be china-specific builds of mining software that will randomize the ports and protocol so that the miners could continue to mine, or the literal warehouses of miners would just pack up and move to india or somewhere, where the price of electricity is just slightly more expensive, but not much. and I just don't see that happening.
Nvidia and AMD just suddenly shitting out 10x as many cards as they are now, isn't going to solve the problem, because the problem isn't with the supply, it's the hashing ability of the cards, and the price of them. AMD will sell literally every single RX 580 that they put out for $300, which is more than $70 above MSRP (at $229 from a quick google search). As long as the GPUs keep the profitability that they have, they will continue selling like they are. it's an inelastic demand, it's always going to be there, and it's outside the control of both AMD and Nvidia, as long as (hashing rate * BTC/hash * $/BTC - electricity cost/month) * est months mining - initial price > 0
Am I wrong? I hope so, I want to upgrade my rig next year to Volta, but I just don't see that happening. Please convince me I'm wrong.
submitted by A_Wild_Shiny_Mew to pcmasterrace [link] [comments]

On Proof: A Confession about Satoshi?

The monster paragraph below, which is titled "On Proof", was taken from a website/blog I found while searching for a paper authored by CSW. The site I found appears to be some sort of confessional-tell-all CV authored by CSW to prove his identify. The text doesn't prove anything about CSW's work in bitcoin if true, but its possibly relevant to his ability to design bitcoin, his overall genius, and credibility. I have no position on whether Craig Wright is Satoshi at the moment.
I have no information about whether the wall-o-text contains anything true, who runs the site I found, or what the site is exactly. However, the text-wall contains plenty of info about CSW that can be cross-checked with official records.
In addition to the text (the wall is his, not mine), I've provided a link to the site, taken and an imgur album of my screen-captures. Some of the pictures show the browser tabs I had open when they were taken for time-stamping purposes.
WARNING. There is a downloader thing on the site, and I'm not sure about the funky URL. Be careful if you do visit.
http://bvde.cba.pl/9178.html (Text below)
http://imgur.com/a/NCfdt
It seems that I have to do this every couple years and each time it is generally worse as I have added to the list. In recent months I have been causing trouble again and as such there are always those who choose not to believe me or to engage in an attack on my character as a solution to not addressing the issue at hand. Let us start with career and that I am the VP of GICSR in Australia. Other than using an email address at GICSR, I am listed on the board as a director. Next, I am a trustee with the Uniting Church Trust Fund and am otherwise involved with the UC. That is me on page two of the funds newsletter where I had been accepted in the appointment. I have shaved, but it is still me in the photo. My role at Charles Sturt University is noted below and I have staff ID 11293457 if you want to actually check that. On certifications. I hold the three platinum certifications GSE, GSE-Malware and GSE-Compliance from GIAC. I will add my SANS/GIAC certs. I have more than any other person globally (not a boast, it is a fact). This is 37 Certs from GIAC alone. Click the link if you do not believe me. The answer is not just to believe this, validate it. All up, with Cisco and others I have over 100 certifications. Now, do you really care if you believe the total? Not really, and does it matter, not really. Some of those will start to disappear as I cannot maintain them and actually have a life anymore. I have 27 recertification’s next year that I will do at a cost of over $11,000. I will let some lapse. Degrees and more I am not going to cover all of my degrees any more. I will not discuss more than post graduate and a list of the papers associated with my doctoral work and I will simply cover those related to my profession here. I will not discuss my role as a lay pastor or theology degree other than face to face and only whit those I choose to discuss it with. There is enough to know I am involved with the Uniting Church and I am not here to convert people. If you are an atheist, that is your choice and I will not try to sway you at all. The thing is, atheism is also a belief. It is not and cannot be proven with science and hence is in a way also a religion even if in the negative. I do not wish to debate this (unless it is face to face, I like you and there is wine involved). If you are not happy with my post graduate qualifications, adding undergraduate qualifications right down to the associate degree level will add little. Then, does my having an Associate degree in Science (Organic Chemistry, Fuel sciences) add anything to my role in digital forensics and information security. If you really want to know what these are, there are old posts that searching will eventually uncover. As for the bio and claim that I am “a perpetual student with numerous post graduate degrees including an LLM specializing in international commercial law and ecommerce law, a Masters Degree in mathematical statistics from Newcastle as well as working on his 4th IT focused Masters degree (Masters in System Development) from Charles Sturt University where he lectures subjects in a Masters degree in digital forensics. He is writing his second doctorate, a PhD on the quantification of information system risk at CSU.” Charles Sturt University The masters degrees from CSU are: MMgmt(IT) – Masters of Management (IT) MNSA – Master of Network and System Admin MInfoSysSec – Master of Master Information Systems Security MSysDev – Master of System Development (nearly complete… I am just running out of subjects to do at the University. I even needed to take one where I was the author of the text just to have the credit points). Next year I complete my second doctorate. I also have two other Masters degrees not from CSU (the 4 they note in the link are those listed above), a Masters in Statistics (Newcastle AU) as well as a Masters in Law (Northumbria, UK). I am also doing the SANS Masters degree and have one more thing to complete this. That will give me 2 doctorates, 7 masters degrees and 8 other degrees. It is not too difficult to check that I am enrolled in the MSISE at the SANS Technology Institute (Master of Information Systems Engineering). Other than having presentations on the site (see this link) it would be crazy for me to state this. I have 37 GIAC certifications (which is most of either of the STI masters degrees. If I was to misrepresent my status at SANS/GIAC, the ethics policy means I will lose them all. So, first it is simple to actually check AND I have too much to lose in lying. I do this every couple years. Here is a link to a past time I had to do the same. Northumbria University I completed a Masters in Law in a UK based University. This is: LLM Northumbria – Master of Law (International Commerce Law, Ecommerce Law with commendation). PG Diploma in Law My dissertation was on "Internet Intermediary Liability". I received a commendation. If you need to check, I had Student Number: 05024288 Newcastle University MSTAT – Master of Statistics I was student number 3047661 at the University of Newcastle here in Australia. My thesis that I wrote to complete this degree was on “The homogeneity of Variances”. I analysed and tested many of the common statistical methods used in homogeneity tests in statistics (such as the Levene tests). Why? The links are associated with universities and others, so it is not too difficult to check me out. I am not stopping you. The only thing I do not wish to discuss openly is my role with the Uniting Church. My theological belief is one of the few things that remains personal and more than the stuff the church posts publically about me (which I attempt to minimise) I will not discuss. If you believe that my trying to maintain one personal and private thing in my life means I am lying, believe as you will. It does not impact my chosen career in information security and nor does it detract from this. Contrary to the believe structure some hold, one CAN be a doctor of the church as well as a scientist. Religion and Science do not overlap and nor should one seek to make them do so. We can never prove nor disprove the existence of any religion or other spiritual belief structure. This is why I also preach tolerance. I believe I am correct as far as I can be (and that is about zero as the human mind is too small to comprehend the infinite in any extent and any person who tells you differently is a liar or a fool). I comprehend and believe in my way, others in their own. Is Islam, Catholicism, Judaism etc right? Yes and no. Am I right, yes and know. Basically, we see a small aspect of the infinite and that is all we ever will. We can be right and wrong at the same time and will never be completely right as we cannot hold the concept of an infinite in our heads (and I have studied large number theory). In a way, I hate having to do this each few years. In this, I have scratched the surface of what I have done and that leaves many in disbelief. That stated, I fail in humility for this as well as other reasons. On Sanity I guess that the final aspect of this is on sanity. I have been accused of being insane for doing all I do. To take a quote from one of my doctoral supervisors: “Craig, you have a doctorate, why on earth would you want to go through this again. It is insane.” I love study. I can do it and I am good at it. I do not need to do formal study, but I like it. I enjoy the structure. I like the process and it means that I do more. I do not watch sport (I do play sport but there is a distinction) and I do not watch TV. Formal study is MY form of relaxation. To those people (usually without degrees) who keep attacking me and saying I cannot have done this, I offer you the chance to validate all of it. Now, the answer is that you can do something. Instead of engaging in an exercise designed to cut down tall poppies and to attack those who have done something, why not do something yourself? I will (and have in the past) helped others. I will do this for nearly anyone (none of us are not perfect and that includes me). There are ways that anyone can study these days. In fact, I am more than happy to help all I can to have people achieve this. Instead of attacking the character of others you see as frightening (and this really is what this is about), how about you spend the time doing a qualification yourself? Really, my email is public. I keep offering, instead of attacking the accomplishments of others, add to your own. I offer this and from time to time, people take me up on it. This is, I offer to help others improve their education. Not for money, not for fame, but as I want to have a better aware and education world. In this, I also benefit as a more educated (practically) world is one that will have fewer (though always some) issues and which could be more tolerant. Certification and membership numbers A limited subset of certifications I hold is listed below: CISSP # 47302 (ICS)2 Certified Information Systems Security Professional ISSMP # 47302 (ICS)2 Information Systems Security – Management Professional ISSAP # 47302 (ICS)2 Information Systems Security – Architecture Professional CISA # 0542911 IS Audit and Control Association – Certified Information Systems Auditor CISM # 0300803 IS Audit and Control Association – Certified Information Security Manager CCE # 480 ISFCE – Certified Computer Examiner ISSPCS # 051 International Systems Security Professional Certification Scheme MCSA # 3062393 Microsoft Certified Systems Administrator MCSE # 3062393 Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer MCSE # 3062393 Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer (Mail) MCSE # 3062393 Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer (Security) MCDBA # 3062393 Microsoft Certified Database Administrator MIEEE # 87028913 Member IEEE AFAIM # PM133844 Associate Fellow Aust Inst. Management (lapsed now as I have been culling memberships – they cost too much to maintain) MACS # 3015822 Senior Member Aust Computer Society GIAC… NOT ALLL GSE-Compliance #0001 [Platinum] GIAC Security Compliance (GSE-Compliance) GSEC # 10506 [Gold] GIAC Security Essentials Certification (GSEC) GCIH # 06896 [Silver] GIAC Certified Incident Handler GCIA # 02913 [Silver] GIAC Certified Intrusion Analyst GCFW # 01891 [Silver] GIAC Certified Firewall Analyst GCWN # 01234 [Silver] GIAC Certified Windows Security Administrator GAWN # 00894 [Silver] GIAC Assessing Wireless Networks GCUX # 00587 [Silver] GIAC Certified UNIX Security Administrator GNET # GIAC .Net GSLC # GIAC Security Leadership Certification GHTQ # 00368 [Silver] GIAC Cutting Edge Hacking Techniques G7799 # 0039 [GOLD] GIAC Certified ISO-17799 Specialist (G7799) GCFA # 0265 [GOLD] GIAC Certified Forensics Analyst (GCFA) GSNA # 0571 [GOLD] GIAC Systems and Network Auditor (GSNA) GSAE # 00141 [Silver] GIAC Security Audit Essentials (GSAE) GLEG # 0006 [GOLD] GIAC Legal Issues (GLEG) GLEG Incorporates GIAC Business Law and Computer Security (GBLC) GLEG Incorporates GIAC Contracting for Data Security (GCDS) GLIT GLEG Incorporates GIAC Legal Issues in Information Technologies (GLIT) GLFR # 0016 GIAC Law of Fraud (GLFR) GREM # 0586 GIAC Reverse Engineering Malware (GREM) GPCI # 0086 GIAC Payment Card Industry (GPCI) GSPA # 0101 GIAC Security Policy and Awareness (GSPA) GLDR # 0101 GIAC Leadership (GLDR) GWAS # 0535 GIAC Web Application Security (GWAS) GIPS # 0036 GIAC Intrusion Prevention (GIPS) SSP-MPA # 0416 Stay Sharp Program – Mastering Packet Analysis (SSP-MPA) SSP-GHD # 0246 Stay Sharp Program – Google Hacking and Defense (SSP-GHD) SSP-DRAP # 0171 Stay Sharp Program – Defeating Rogue Access Points (SSP-DRAP) Papers / Publications: Peer Reviewed Papers Right now, I have a further 8 papers in peer review. The following are all accepted and/or published. 2012 (Accepted) 1. Wright, C. (2012, February). Hacktivism, terror and the state: The Importance of Effectively Enforcing Cyber Security Legislation. Paper to be presented at the 10th Anniversary National Security Australia Conference. 2011 2. Wright, C. (2011, December) Who pays for a security violation? An assessment into the cost of lax security, negligence and risk, a glance into the looking glass. Paper to be presented at the International Conference on Business Intelligence and Financial Engineering. . 3. Wright, C. (2011, December) Current issues and liability facing Internet Intermediaries. Paper to be presented at the International Conference on Business Intelligence and Financial Engineering. 4. Wright, C. (2011, December) Criminal Specialization as a corollary of Rational Choice. Paper to be presented at the International Conference on Business Intelligence and Financial Engineering. Wright, C. (2011, December) A preamble into aligning Systems engineering and Information security risk measures. Paper to be presented at the International Conference on Business Intelligence and Financial Engineering. 5. Wright, C. & Via, T. (2011, December) Modeling System Audit as a Sequential test with Discovery as a Failure Time Endpoint. Paper to be presented at the International Conference on Business Intelligence and Financial Engineering. 6. Wright, C. (2011) “Exploiting format Strings with Python” Hakin9 7. Wright, C. (2011) “More Exploits with Python” Hakin9 8. Wright, C. (2011, September)Of Black Swans, Platypii and Bunyips. The outlier and normal incident in risk management. Paper presented at CACS2011 Australia. 9. Wright, C. & Zia, T. (2011, July)Compliance or Security, what cost? (Poster)” Australasian Conference on Information Security and Privacy. 10. Wright, C. (2011) “A comparative study of attacks against Corporate IIS and Apache Web Servers” Sans Technology Inst, USA 11. Wright, C. (2011) “Rationally Opting for the Insecure Alternative: Negative Externalities and the Selection of Security Controls” Republished and extended Paper, Sans Technology Inst, USA 12. Wright, C. (2011) “Rationally Opting for the Insecure Alternative: Negative Externalities and the Selection of Security Controls” Republished and extended Paper, Sans Technology Inst, USA 13. Wright, C. & Zia T (2011)”Rationally Opting for the Insecure Alternative: Negative Externalities and the Selection of Security Controls” CISIS Spain 14. Wright, C. & Zia T (2011)”A Quantitative Analysis into the Economics of Correcting Software Bugs” CISIS Spain 2010 15. Wright, C. (2010) “Software, Vendors and Reputation: an analysis of the dilemma in creating secure software” Intrust 2010 China 16. Wright, C. & Zia T (2010) “The Economics of Developing Security Embedded Software” SecAU Australia 17. Wright, C. (2010) “The not so Mythical IDS Man-Month: Or Brooks and the rule of information security” ISSRE USA 18. Wright, C. (2010) “Packer Analysis Report – Debugging and unpacking the NsPack 3.4 and 3.7 packer.” Sans Technology Inst, USA 2009 19. Wright, C. (2009) “Effective Patch Management – Saving Time and Getting Better Security” MISTI USA 20. Wright, C. (2009) “Database Auditing” Testing Experience, Germany 21. Wright, C. (2009) “SaaS Security” MISTI USA 22. CISecurity (Multiple) (2009) CIS BIND Benchmarks” Centre For Internet Security, USA 2008 23. Wright C, Kleiman D & Sundhar R.S. (2008) “Overwriting Hard Drive Data: The Great Wiping Controversy” Lecture Notes in Computer Science (Springer Berlin / Heidelberg) 24. Wright, C. (2008) “Detecting Hydan: Statistical Methods For Classifying The Use Of Hydan Based Stegonagraphy In Executable Files” Sans Technology Inst USA 25. Wright, C. (2008) “Using Neural Networks” Google 26. Wright, C. (2008) “Ensuring secure data transfer and data sharing” DQ Asia Pacific 27. Wright, C. (2008) “Record and Document Destruction in a Digital World” IT Security World, USA 28. Wright, C. (2008) “Managing Security in a Global Company” IT Security World, USA 29. Wright, C. (2008) “A Quick and Nasty overview of finding TrueCrypt Volumes” Sans Technology Institute 30. Wright, C. (2008) “Exploring Data Visualisation” Strategic Data Mining 31. Wright, C. (2008) “Statistical Methods to Determine the Authenticity of Data” CACS2008, Au 32. Wright, C. (2008) “Text Data Mining, the future of Digital Forensics” Hex Journal USA 33. Wright, C. (2008) “Compliance, law and Metrics: What you need to meet and how you prove it” SANS ACT 34. Wright, C. (2008) “Current Issues in DNS” Sans Technology Inst, USA 35. Wright, C. (2008) “Advanced Methods to Remotely Determine Application Versions” NS2008 LV, USA 36. Wright, C. (2008) “An in-depth review of the security features inherent in Firefox 3.0 Compared to IE 8.0” iDefense, USA 2007 37. Wright, C. (2007) “The Problem With Document Destruction” ITAudit, Vol 10. 10 Aug 2007, The IIA, USA 38. Wright, C. (2007) “Requirements for Record Keeping and Document Destruction in a Digital World” Sans Technology Inst, USA 39. Wright, C. (2007) “Electronic Contracting in an Insecure World” Sans Technology Inst, USA 40. Wright, C. (2007) “The Problem with Document Destruction” IRMA UK (Republished) 41. Wright, C. (2007) “Ethical Attacks miss the point!” System Control Journal ISACA 42. Wright, C. (2007) “Where Vulnerability Testing fails” System Control Journal ISACA 43. Wright, C. (2007) “Application, scope and limits of Letters of Indemnity in regards to the International Law of Trade” Internal Publication, BDO Aug 2007 44. Wright, C. (2007) “UCP 500, fizzle or bang” Internal Publication, BDO July 2007 2006 45. Wright, C. (2006) “Port Scanning A violation of Property rights” Hakin9 46. Wright, C. (2006) “A Taxonomy of Information Systems Audits, Assessments and Reviews” SANS Technology Inst USA 47. Wright, C. (2006) “RISK & Risk Management” 360 Security Summit AU 48. Wright, C. (2006) “A QUANTITATIVE TIME SERIES ANALYSIS OF MALWARE AND VULNERABILITY TRENDS” Ruxcon AU 2005 49. Wright, C. (2005) “Analysis of a serial based digital voice recorder” Published 2006 SANS Technology Inst USA 50. Wright, C. (2005) “Implementing an Information Security Management System (ISMS) Training process” SANS Darling Harbour AU 51. Wright, C. (2005) “Beyond Vulnerability Scans — Security Considerations for Auditors” ITAudit, The IIA, USA 52. Wright, C. (2005) “PCI Payment Card Industry Facts” Retail Industry journal, July 2005 2001 53. Multiple Authors (1999) “Windows NT Security Step by Step” SANS Technology Inst USA 2000 54. Ashbury A & Wright, C. (2000) “DNS Security in Australia” Net Security, June 2000. 1999 55. Wright, C. (1999) “A Comparative analysis of Firewalls” in “The Internet Hot Sheet” ATT Sept 1999 Books / Book Chapters 1. Wright, C. (2008) “0123456789The IT Regulatory and Standards Compliance Handbook: How to Survive Information Systems Audit and Assessments0123456789” Syngress USA 2. Litchko, J; Lang, D; Hennell , C; Wright, C & Linden, M V (2011) ““0123456789Official (ISC)2 Guide to the CISSP(R)-ISSMP(R) CBK0123456789” CRC Press, ISC2 USA 3. Kleiman, D; Wright, C; Varsalone, V& Clinton, T (2007) “0123456789The Official CHFI Study Guide0123456789” (Exam 312-49) (Paperback)” Syngress, USA 2007 This book is used as a text for ITE-513 at Charles Sturt University 4. Multiple Authors (2009) “0123456789Cisco Router and Switch Forensics: Investigating and Analyzing Malicious Network Activity0123456789”, Syngress Press 5. Multiple Authors (2009) “0123456789Mobile Malware Attacks and Defense0123456789”, Syngress Press 6. Multiple Authors (2008) “0123456789Check Point NGX R65 Security0123456789” Syngress, USA This book is used as a text at Charles Sturt University 7. Multiple Authors (2008) “0123456789Mobile Malicious Code0123456789” Syngress, USA 8. Multiple Authors (2008) “0123456789Best Forensic Book0123456789” Syngress, USA In 2012 the following book will be published by Taylor Francis Academic press: SCADA Security. I am the author of the Forensic chapter Chapter 16: Forensics Management
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